No more interviews for junior level post recruitment

IMPHAL, Mar 30: There will be no more job interviews during the recruitment of junior level posts for various Government departments in the State based on an order issued by the Department of Personnel.
The post No more interviews for junior level post…

IMPHAL, Mar 30: There will be no more job interviews during the recruitment of junior level posts for various Government departments in the State based on an order issued by the Department of Personnel.

The post No more interviews for junior level post recruitment appeared first on The Sangai Express.

Exclusive interview with Mangka Mayanglambam

An exclusive interview with Mangka Mayanglambam – a young folk singer from Manipur. “TalkMore Entertainment” presents in association with “KanglaOnline”

An exclusive interview with Mangka Mayanglambam – a young folk singer from Manipur. “TalkMore Entertainment” presents in association with “KanglaOnline”

The Hindu featured interview with Manipur footballer Moirangthem Gouramangi

In an interview featured in The Hindu, Moirangthem Goiuramangi, a native of Sekmai Manipur, expressed the need of grass root level training to improve the quality of Indian Football. The Manipur

Manipur player Moirangthem Gouramangi featured in The Hindu. Photo: K.V. Srinivasan (Hindu)

Manipur player Moirangthem Gouramangi featured in The Hindu. Photo: K.V. Srinivasan (Hindu)

In an interview featured in The Hindu, Moirangthem Goiuramangi, a native of Sekmai Manipur, expressed the need of grass root level training to improve the quality of Indian Football.

The Manipur native who currently played for Pune City FC opined that the atmosphere in ISL was completely different, as most of the players had played at the highest level and their match-awareness were more.

Moiranthem Gouramangi made his debut for India way back in 2006. Capped 71 times by the national team, the young Manipuri, a product of the Tata Football Academy, plied his trade in the National Football League, then in the re-branded I-League, and now plays in the Indian Super League (ISL) for Pune City FC. The 29-year-old spoke about this transition, and the role of ISL in shaping India’s football future.

Original excerpts of the interview featured in Hindu:

This is your second year in the ISL. How different have the experiences been as compared to your I-League days?

I don’t think we can compare the two. We can’t forget the contribution the I-League has made. I would say, without the I-League there wouldn’t be ISL. Indian football is in transition. One can’t completely depend on the ISL to turn things around overnight. There are lots of positives though. I-League has its limitations budget-wise. There are financial restrictions. It is not as big as what we are seeing today [ISL].

But the ISL has brought in foreign players, and coaches with different styles. In that sense, how has the on-field game evolved?

Technically better. In I-League too we had foreigners. But in ISL, the atmosphere is completely different. Most of them have played at the highest level and their match-awareness is more. So is the tempo of the game. This kind of exposure wasn’t there before. But we [Indians] are not very far behind. We can definitely do well. But we don’t have the necessary structures in place. We need more grassroots-level training.

For a young Indian player, how beneficial can the ISL be?

I’ll tell you from my own experience. I have been to countries like Australia, Denmark, Ukraine. There, I had to train like a foreigner. I mean, I had to adapt to their culture. Now, everything is coming to our country. Our players need not feel lonely here. It’s a good opportunity and the younger generation should take it seriously.

Can you give a realistic time-frame for things to improve?

At least another two years [for some signs to emerge].

What has been the biggest takeaway for you from the ISL?

I am from the Northeast. I never expected to go to Mumbai, Chennai and even Pune — not so popular for football — and see 30,000 people come and watch us play. We never experienced this before. Bringing the crowds back to the stadium has been the biggest thing and the attendance is increasing day by day. Nobody wants to play in empty stadiums. I feel this is only the beginning [of better things to come].

Source: The Hindu

CPDM Interview Series: “They say ILPS is a movement of the people of Manipur but not all communities are involved” – Manishwar Nongmaithem

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline. – Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur? – Why are they

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline.

– Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur?
– Why are they fearless to speak out their minds?
– How will the judgmental sections interpret their minds: are these students to be seen as misguided or forced to have political views and some democratic actions?

Read the background of this interview series: CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

 

CPDM Interview with Manishwar Nongmaithem

Manishwar Nongmaithem

Manishwar Nongmaithem

Manishwar Nongmaithem
33 years Old
Kakching Ningthou Leikai, Thoubal District, Manipur, India
Advisor, Manipur Students’ Association Delhi

CPDM: Where are you presently located?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: Delhi.

CPDM: Why did you leave Manipur and choose Delhi for your studies?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I wanted to visit places and observe the conditions of the capitalist governments. Delhi was my first destination choice. This has also made me know clearly about the governance of my state.

CPDM: Which class are you in? please tell us the name of your institute too
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I am presently a student of tourism studies in IGNOU

CPDM: What is the purpose of your education? What ambition in life motivates you to pursue education?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: Since I belong to a system made for the comfort of the rich, I realised that I need a certificate too. I will use it when necessary. I want to work as a political activist to produce “revolutionaries” who can bring about a just and equitable society.

CPDM: What are your views on the inner line permit system movement in Manipur? Do you think it is a right movement? Please share us your thoughts.
Manishwar Nongmaithem: The use of the phrase “Inner Line Permit System” by the people of Manipur is appreciated. The people are united and have been demanding relentlessly to make this one phrase into an act. The demand of ILPS is to save the indigenous people. In this, the government has used its state forces to suppress my brethren agitators, mainly the students who have taken a firm commitment to challenge the government.

What I want to ask is how these tactics of suppressing the people’s movement has come into being? What people are witnessing and experiencing is just a symptom, the actual disease is veiled by the government and so people cannot see it or understand it. Are we going to blame the citizens for not having enough knowledge on this? Or are we going to say that it is the government’s trap or plan?

Before we start a discussion on ILPS, we must first know about the veil of the government i.e.; democracy. A great lie of Indian government will be democracy. This is the word the government uses to throw ash into people’s eyes to make the world a market place for the rich people. Its branches has reached my homeland Manipur too. So, I think we must have a discussion on weather we should have ILPS or not for saving the indigenous people. If a government truly upholds the democratic principles, I don’t think we need an ILPS.

Since many communities and ethnicities reside, the government might be at loss pondering which one community to protect and which one not? While trying to fulfil one’s brim, will it result in evaporating the others? This is a question well circulated among the numerically dominant meeteis, kukis and nagas. There are communities who will be at loss when there is ILPS. Are we going to hide the reasons forever?  They say it is a people’s movement but are we doing it just for the heck of it? Can’t we find the answers to these questions together? If this is a people’s movement, why didn’t they give an opportunity for an open dialogue?

On a concluding note, I would want to add that saving an indigenous population is a natural phenomenon in a just and equitable society. We need to work jointly here.

CPDM: How have you come to know about the inner line permit system? Would you share it with us?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I was aware of the mobilisation of students for strike in the 80’s by AMSU during my school days at home. The movement was “chasing mayangs” back then (they didn’t say outsiders). But when I was in Delhi, in 2011, as a member of the Human Rights Committee of Manipur Students’ Association Delhi, a group of people from Manipur came for demanding ILPS. I interacted and had discussions with them and from then onwards I knew about the nature and meaning of ILPS.

CPDM: Do you think the student community should/ should not participate in the ilp movement? Please elaborate your statement.
Manishwar Nongmaithem: The students should take part in the Inner Line Permit System movement. When it is a movement of the land, it is natural for people to participate in it. I am of the opinion that it is also very important for the students to do whatever they can. Old age is inevitable, everyone must be aware of it. But, there is a big difference between getting old and having an indepth knowledge of the issues of the land. This is the reason why young students should take active role in the issues of the land. Even if peace prevails in the land, if the government does not pay attention to small issues like lack of teachers in the school, then it is natural for students to come out and demand for teachers. Studying is the duty of students but when the society that child belongs to is burning, will the student still sit back and study?

CPDM: Do you think students who have left Manipur for their studies should take part in political activities of such nature? Please elaborate.
Manishwar Nongmaithem: Many Manipuri students study outside. Even if they are out from Manipur, they are still Manipuris. I am sure everyone must have attachments for their homeland and ethnicities. However, not everyone thinks the same. People stand and do for what they believe in. And it is not that such people do not harm the situation of the land. Few students who are out of the state take part in the issues of the land. Students who are volunteers in student organisations are the ones taking active roles. Most do not want to participate. This is because they are either scared or lazy, shy, timid, lacks interest or time, has no political consciousness or maybe the present situation of the government has made them so. I have mentioned earlier too that in the political issues of the land, the people have a huge role to play. So, it should be kept in mind that in “the people”, the students are also involved. It is the student stage which is best suited for a political consciousness and to get involved in political activities of the land. This is the reason I believe that students should not remain mumed in institutes which supports the government as this will render unfit to the true meaning of students. Therefore, I am not in favour of concluding a precious student’s life only to the confines of books and syllabuses.

CPDM: Have you taken any initiative/ active role in the ILPS movement? If so, please state it. Did anyone force you to join the agitation or take responsibility of it?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I have read articles and pamphlets on the Inner Line Permit System. As a political activist, I know my stand. I clearly know my goal, my duty, and my responsibility in the ILPS movement of the people.  If at any point of time an issue is brought up as an issue of the land at large, it is very important to discuss and dissect the ideology and goal of the individuals leading the movement. Because it will be wrong to be a part of any movement only because it is a people’s movement; it requires rigorous discussion. Similarly, the present ILPS movement, its genesis, and where it stands today, the people’s uprising, and the actions of the government, all of it must be discussed thoroughly. The student platforms provide room for debates of all sorts. This has given a wider opportunity to convey messages to young students and to the society. I have taken this opportunity to gather students (especially in Delhi) and have held talks and discussions on what ILPS is. We have together raised our voices to free ourselves from the demographic invasion arising out of the nature and policies of the government. Talks, meetings, discussions were conducted in different places with people from different communities. All these were done purely out of my own intention consciously and I think this needs to be done too.

CPDM: What are the reasons for the failure of ILPS demand movement?
Manishwar Nongmaithem:  There will be certain reasons for the ILPS movement not to be a successful one. Those are:

  1. They say it is a movement of the people of Manipur but not all communities are involved.
  2. There are many people/communities who are not in favour of ILPS in Manipur.
  3. The actions of the government suppress the people’s movement.
  4. The Indian government too has put aside this issue.
  5. How many of the demands in the ILPS movement are valid? This question needs to be asked.
  6. The government is an experienced one in tricking movements and uprisings.
  7. The committee which is taking a lead role in ILPS has not opened its doors for an open dialogue and,
  8. There are many loopholes in ILPS itself.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government of Manipur with regards to the inner line permit system movement?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I want to put forward these words to the dictator government of Manipur which is using the mask of democracy in relation to ILPS. They are:

  1. Stop this war you have carried out against the people of Manipur immediately.
  2. Revoke the restrictions you have imposed on the people i.e; curfew immediately and open the schools you have closed down.
  3. Give justice to Sapam Robinhood who has been killed in the democratic movement of the people.
  4. Take up steps to normalise the lives of people you have much tortured to divert the uprising.
  5. The government must take up immediate steps to bring a political solution to save the indigenous peoples of Manipur.
  6. The moral-less training of the state forces must be replaced by a new training method which is in tandem with the people.
  7. If you say that you are the government but don’t do your duty then you should resign immediately.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government and police forces of Manipur on the issue of ILPS implementation?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: To the Manipur police and the government forces: The citizens are aware that the condition of the government has made the state forces a buy-able commodity in the market. People sell off their lands and properties to buy any government post for lakhs of rupees. Upto what extent will the people of Manipur have faith in them? For the government it is compulsory to pile up money for personal purpose. So, it won’t be wrong to state that most of the posts in Manipur Police must have been shared among the MLA’s. Those working in Manipur police are all Manipuris. I think the police should not behave in this brutal beastly manner to their own people or for the sake of humanity should have behaved humanly, even though the government directs them to behave brutality. The student they have killed might also be one of their locality mates. What poisonous potion has the government fed them that they, the forces who are supposed to protect us, are biting us instead? Don’t they have relatives, homes, children and locality mates? They will definitely have. Which face of their personality have they hidden for their family members? We the people of our land who are working for our land; are we going to end up like this by killing one another in broad day light? Don’t they have any thinking for the human society? Yes, it is true that you must have been given dangerous weapons, fed obnoxious drugs and must have gone through tough training regimes. But isn’t it time that you start thinking for whom it is? It is high time that we together save ourselves from drowning into the plots of the government.

CPDM: What message do you want to convey to the leaders and civil society organisations of ILPS movement?
Manishwar Nongmaithem: I put forward few words to the civil society organisations who has taken lead roles in the issues of the state in relation to the ILPS movement. First, I would be glad if you could organise or give an opportunity to organise mass inter community discussions on what ILP is, its nature, meaning etcetera. Being a state issue, many burdens and questions are bound to arise from all angles. If you consider these questions important, you can connect through social media to clear off the people’s doubts. I believe, you will stand firmly against the strong tide of the government. Most importantly, I would want the forerunners in the movement who are working on the platform of students to have proper classes on political consciousness and ideologies. The victory is for the people.

—x—

Read the interview series:  CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

–> Interview with Haobam Supriya: ILPS Movement is a People’s Movement

–> Interview with Chingtham Balbir: ILPS Movement is not Selected Few

–> Interview with Thoithoi Huidrom: Stop not till the ILPS demand is achieved

–> Interview with Irengbam Priobata: No one forced me to participate in any students movements, I was happy to be part of it

CPDM Interview Series: “No one forced me to participate in any students movements, I was happy to be part of it” – Irengbam Priyobata

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline. – Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur? – Why are they

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline.

– Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur?
– Why are they fearless to speak out their minds?
– How will the judgmental sections interpret their minds: are these students to be seen as misguided or forced to have political views and some democratic actions?

Read the background of this interview series: CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

 

Irengbam Priyobata, MSAD

Irengbam Priyobata

CPDM Interview with Irengbam Priyobata

Student Profile
Irengbam Priyobata
23 years Old
Irengbam, Bishnupur district
Vice President, Manipur Students’ Association Delhi

 

CPDM: Please tell us your name and surname, sex and age.
Irengbam Priyobata: Irengbam Priyobata, male, 23 years

CPDM: Where are you from?
Irengbam Priyobata: Irengbam, Bishnupur district.

CPDM: Where are you presently located?
Irengbam Priyobata: Delhi.

CPDM: Why did you leave manipur and choose Delhi for your studies?
Irengbam Priyobata: I didn’t very much liked the idea of leaving Manipur for studies and I wanted to study in Manipur.  On the other hand, my parents wanted me to study out of town because colleges in Manipur have low teaching standards. These circumstances drove me to Delhi University for my education.

CPDM: Which class are you in? Please tell us the name of your institute too.
Irengbam Priyobata: I have completed my graduation this time in Zakir Husain College, Delhi.

CPDM: What is the purpose of your education?  What ambition in life motivates you to pursue education?
Irengbam Priyobata: For knowledge and certificate. There were many things I wanted to become in life but none of them lures me now. My family elders have pressured me to get a job and make their lives happy and comfortable. I will fulfil their wishes, but I didn’t pursue education for these.

CPDM: What are your views on the inner line permit system movement in manipur? Do you think it is a right movement? Please share us your thoughts.
Irengbam Priyobata: Inner Line Permit System is a movement of the people and calls for saving the indigenous people of Manipur. But who is an indigenous person? Will only those persons residing in Manipur prior to 1951 be called indigenous people? There are many questions here. The agitators should know this first and take part in the movement. There are outsiders who have moved to Manipur in 1956, call Manipur their homeland and have no other home in other states of India. I wonder where they stand in the ILP question.

CPDM: How have you come to know about the inner line permit system? Would you share it with us?
Irengbam Priyobata: I have been participating in the ILP movement since I was in class 9. In classes 11 and 12 too, I have participated in various movements in Manipur. But I didn’t consult books and papers to know more about it. After coming to Delhi, I knew more about it from Manipur Students’ Association, Delhi.

CPDM: Do you think the student community should/ should not participate in the ilp movement? Please elaborate your statement.
Irengbam Priyobata: I believe the students should be the ones taking a more proactive role in the Inner line permit system movement, for this movement is for the future generation. His education is useless if a student just studies for the sake of studying and not take part in state issues. There are many benefits of students taking part in the movement, our system discourages non students to take lead roles in any agitation.  We have a tradition of killing people on false charges too.

CPDM: Do you think students who have left manipur for their studies should take part in political activities of such nature? Please elaborate.
Irengbam Priyobata: Those who have gone out to study are still Manipuris. All of their family members reside in Manipur, nor has the student changed his residence. It’s just a matter of few years, one day he will go back to his birth place. So, he should participate in the incidents and movements related to Manipur. Even if I leave home, I must save my home from brning if a fire breaks out.

CPDM: Have you taken any initiative/ active role in the ilps movement? If so. Please state it. Did anyone force you to join the agitation or take responsibility of it?
Irengbam Priyobata: I was the monitor of my class in 11th standard. There was a great movement organised by AMSU, DESAM in those days. I led my school in the sit in protests. No one forced me and I was happy to be a part of it. In 2014, I played a major role in the signature campaign on ILPS in Delhi. This time around too, as the President in charge of MSAD, I am in the forefront supporting this movement.

CPDM: what are the reasons for the failure of ilps demand movement?
Irengbam Priyobata: The movement going in the wrong direction, the government orienting it in a way which pleases them and lack of unity.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government of manipur with regards to the inner line permit system movement?
Irengbam Priyobata: It is a people’s movement. In a place like Manipur, where numerous small and numerically weak indeginous communities exist, saving them and protecting them is very important.

CPDM: Inner Line Permit Ki Khongjang Asiga Mari Leinana Nahakna Manipur Police Amasung Government Forces Singgi Mafamda Kari Hainingbage?
Irengbam Priyobata: In a democracy the people can ask for any sorts of demand and this uprising is not a personal one. The police and we are not enemies. Every Manipuri force has become a faithful dog to their masters. Don’t all of them support the ILPS demand, or, have their uniform made them dogs? The genesis of all is this dog government who have unleashed their other underdogs.

CPDM: What message do you want to convey to the leaders and civil society organisations of ilps movement?
Irengbam Priyobata: It is easier to start a movement than to sustain it till the goal is achieved. Don’t want a temporary movement which lacks goal. Since you have already stepped in, we don’t want anything other than the goal itself and we won’t settle for anything. I want the leaders to set a target and see how far we can move forward. I don’t want the people’s movement to get hazy but wish their voices get shriller without break.

—x—

Read the interview series:  CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

–> Interview with Haobam Supriya: ILPS Movement is a People’s Movement

–> Interview with Chingtham Balbir: ILPS Movement is not Selected Few

–> Interview with Thoithoi Huidrom: Stop not till the ILPS demand is achieved

–> Interview with Irengbam Priobata: No one forced me to participate in any students movements, I was happy to be part of it

CPDM Interview Series: Stop not till the ILPS demand is achieved – Thoithoi Huidrom

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline. – Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur? – Why are they

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline.

– Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur?
– Why are they fearless to speak out their minds?
– How will the judgmental sections interpret their minds: are these students to be seen as misguided or forced to have political views and some democratic actions?

Read the background of this interview series: CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

 

CPDM Interview with Thoithoi Huidrom

Thoithoi Huidrom

Thoithoi Huidrom

Name: Thoithoi Huidrom
M. Sc., Central Agricultural University, Imphal
Age: 28 years old
Address: Thangmeiband Lairenhanjaba Leikai, Imphal West

CPDM: Please Tell Us Your Name And Surname, Sex And Age.
Thoithoi Huidrom: Thoithoi Huidrom, Female, 28 years.

CPDM: Where Are You From?
Thoithoi Huidrom: Singjamei Wangma Kshetri Leikai, Imphal East.

CPDM: Which class are you in? Please tell us the name of your institute too.
Thoithoi Huidrom: I have completed my M Sc. from Central Agricutlural University, Imphal West.

CPDM: What is the purpose of your education?  What ambition in life motivates you to pursue education?
Thoithoi Huidrom: To learn, gain knowledge and wisdom and be an independent person. I would like contributing to the society and bring about positive changes and help build a better environment for the future.

CPDM: What are your views on the Inner Line Permit System movement in Manipur? Do you think it is a right movement? Please share us your thoughts.
Thoithoi Huidrom: It is quite natural and justified for an ethnic minority to feel threatened by the majority. So, for the protection of the vulnerable section ILPS is an effective tool. There is enough evidence to prove that such vulnerable sections will soon be engulfed by the massive influxes of outsiders. This will also result in a major humanitarian crisis. Democracy is a game of numbers, we presently (apparently in the future too) don’t have any say in central politics; we don’t want it to happen atleast in the state. There is a common myth that ILPS is mainly for the labour force from major Indian states. This is simply not true. With a porous international border India shares with her neighbours, many foreigners from Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Nepal have entered Manipur illegally, despite the ginormous presence of heavily armed security forces and their unwarranted sweeping powers. With such threats happening in broad daylight, there has to be a law which checks the inflow of foreigners and other immigrants so that the local population is protected. This is why I support ILP system in Manipur.

CPDM: How have you come to know about the Inner Line Permit System? Would you share it with us?
Thoithoi Huidrom: From newspapers and the internet, mainly the social media.

CPDM: Do you think the student community should/ should not participate in the ILPS movement? Please elaborate your statement.
Thoithoi Huidrom: I would here refer to the cliché, “students are tomorrow’s future”. They have every right to decide their future and take part in activities which will affect them the “most” in the near future.

CPDM: You are a woman, and it is a popular notion that women should restrict themselves to the tit bits of family matters and not take active role in politics. What are your views here?
Thoithoi Huidrom: Such are popular myths. But the point is to challenge and prove them wrong. In our society, most women do not confine themselves to the four corners of the wall. Many are bread earners and maintain a fine balance between work and family life. So, if any woman chooses to be in politics she can do well, provided she has the will. But yes, I also conform to the fact that only a microscopic sample of women are in politics today in our society. Breaking the stereotype by a handful can do wonders.

CPDM: Have you taken any initiative/ active role in the ILPS movement? If so. Please state it. Did anyone force you to join the agitation or take responsibility of it?
Thoithoi Huidrom: Yes. I have participated in the sit in protests and rallies out of my own will. I also play the role of educating the people about the urgent need of ILPS in Manipur and why people should support it.

CPDM: Who and where was the movement organised? How was it organised? What form of movement was it?
Thoithoi Huidrom: Locality level women torch bearers were the forerunners of the movement. It was basically a peaceful march.

CPDM: How far has the movement/agitation been successful? Please elaborate.
Thoithoi Huidrom: I won’t call the movement a success until ILP system is implemented.

CPDM: What are the reasons for the failure of ILPS demand movement?
Thoithoi Huidrom: The government which lacks spine and pay no heed either to public interest or sentiment is to be the number one culprit. Secondly, many among us are divided on this issue. The neo-liberals and metro lived elites and intellectuals think that it’s a backward movement against the tide of globalisation and their bookish, practically unfeasible theories, when in fact, globalisation is also one reason as to why there must be some regulation to help preserve and protect the numerically weak ethnic indigenous masses. Thirdly, there are enough sceptics ready to clap hands and say “this is Manipur…nothing can be done. You are only wasting your time.” Such discouragers themselves don’t do anything productive for the society yet fill the minds of people with doubt and render them hesitant to either support or take part in the movement.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government of Manipur with regards to the inner line permit system movement?
Thoithoi Huidrom: I want the government to understand the reasons for public fear and apprehensions which has led to the present unrest and do the needful from their side. The public has had enough of their wait and watch policy and is now at the brink of explosion. Take necessary actions as soon as possible for the benefit of everyone.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government and police forces of Manipur on the issue of ILPS implementation?
Thoithoi Huidrom: The savage actions of the Manipur police commandos are beyond words. Protests are an integral part of a democratic government. The excessive and unnecessary use of force on protesting civilians and students is utterly uncalled for. A precious life would not have lost had the commandos just did their duty of controlling the crowd and not “attacking” them as if they were some foreign enemy.

CPDM: What message do you want to convey to the leaders and civil society organisations of ILPS movement?
Thoithoi Huidrom: For the sake of our future generations, our culture, script and traditions, please continue the movement without dismay. The people are with you. Let not our identity be reduced to some research documents. Stop not till the goal is achieved.

—x—

Read the interview series:  CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

 

CPDM Interview Series: ILPS movement is not for a selected few – Chingtham Balbir

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline. – Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur? – Why are they

Exclusive (online) interview carried out by Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur) for KanglaOnline.

– Why young student activists wanted Inner Line Permit System in Manipur?
– Why are they fearless to speak out their minds?
– How will the judgmental sections interpret their minds: are these students to be seen as misguided or forced to have political views and some democratic actions?

Read the background of this interview series: CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

Chingtham Balbir

Chingtham Balbir

CPDM Interview with Chingtham Balbir

Name: Chingtham Balbir
Age: 21 years old
Address: Thangmeiband Lairenhanjaba Leikai, Imphal West
College: Zakir Husain College, Delhi

 

CPDM: Where are you presently located?
Chingtham Balbir: Delhi.

CPDM: Why did you leave manipur and choose Delhi for your studies?
Chingtham Balbir: The law and order situation in Manipur and the inadequate colleges there were the reasons I came to Delhi for my education.

CPDM: Which class are you in? Please tell us the name of your institute too?
Chingtham Balbir: I have given my 3rd year exam. I study in Zakir Husain oCllege.

CPDM: What is the purpose of your education?  What ambition in life motivates you to pursue education?
Chingtham Balbir: I would say to gain knowledge, wisdom and be independent, live at par with others in the society. I want to be someone who can direct the Manipuri society in the right way and so I am getting educated.

CPDM: What are your views on the inner line permit system movement in manipur? Do you think it is a right movement? Please share us your thoughts.
Chingtham Balbir: I don’t know the nitty gritty rules of ILPS and its provisions. But all in all, I support the cry to save the indigenous people and their resources.

CPDM: How have you come to know about the inner line permit system? Would you share it with us?
Chingtham Balbir: I am a member of Manipur Students’ Association Delhi. So, I get the news and knowledge of what happens in Manipur.

CPDM: Do you think the student community should/ should not participate in the ilp movement? Please elaborate your statement.
Chingtham Balbir: Since this is the people’s movement, I don’t think there should be a separate element called “students”.

CPDM: Do you think students who have left manipur for their studies should take part in political activities of such nature? Please elaborate.
Chingtham Balbir: When students of developed places leave their land and attend colleges elsewhere, it can be inferred that they do it because they wish to learn, explore and gain the experience of other developed places. But our Manipuri students’ chapter is a different one. We are forced to migrate to other places because of the prevailing situation. Again, we cannot study freely in other places. We face financial problems and live in tiny rooms like refugees. This is certainly not indicative of people from developed places seeking knowledge. Considering such facts, I think it is necessary to participate in political activities even if we are far away, so that we can make our homeland a better place.

CPDM: Have you taken any initiative/ active role in the ilps movement? If so. Please state it. Did anyone force you to join the agitation or take responsibility of it?
Chingtham Balbir: Yes. In 2014, during the ILPS agitation, the state forces committed excesses to the student agitators. On this a memorandum was submitted to the President of India. We also organised discussions and campaigns in various colleges on this issue.

CPDM: What are the reasons for the failure of ilps demand movement?
Chingtham Balbir: Difference in opinions among the leaders. Lack of proper research in the field and vague demands by the agitators, I think, are the main reasons.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government of manipur with regards to the inner line permit system movement?
Chingtham Balbir: Politically negotiate the demands of the people.

CPDM: What do you want to say to the government and police forces of manipur on the issue of ilps imlementation?
Chingtham Balbir: Police should perform their duty properly. They should not function like a mercenary forces just for guarding the ministers. They should not pour out their frustrations to the public. The police are for the protection of the people. They must not treat the people as their enemy.

CPDM: What message do you want to convey to the leaders and civil society organisations of ilps movement?
Chingtham Balbir: The movement is not for a selected few. A rigorous discussion of the present movement is recommended and the demands put forward shoud be made crystal clear to the public. Pamphlets and publications can be a means to mobilise the public. Depending merely on public emotions and sentiments to win the movement will be difficult.

—x—

Read the interview series:  CPDM interview-series-why-young-student-activists-wanted-inner-line-permit-system-in-manipur

On students and activism in Manipur

Following is a reproduction of an interview of Dr. Malem Ningthouja(MN) by The Northeast Today(TNT).   TNT: You were associated with a number of student organizations of Manipur, which is an

Following is a reproduction of an interview of Dr. Malem Ningthouja(MN) by The Northeast Today(TNT).

Malem Ningthouja

Malem Ningthouja

 

TNT: You were associated with a number of student organizations of Manipur, which is an insurgency-ravaged state. What challenges did you face as a student leader then?

Dr. Malem: Theoretically, neither militarisation nor insurgency is meant to target the students as a category of soft targets. However, there are challenges that a student leader normally faces in a war-field like situation prevalent in Manipur. Those challenges depend on the ideological position that he/ she upholds and the public issue that he / she raises. A student leader that consistently raises democratic voices against State terrorism and destructive projects is a potential target of the State actors. When I was an active student activists, there were consistent threats from the police and the intelligence. There were also threats from some non- state armed groups, whom I suspected to be working in collusion with the State forces.

 

TNT: What role students can play to bring in integration in a conflict region like Northeast?

Dr. Malem: When commodity relation for profit is the predominant value system above all other forms of human relationship; there are tensions for selfish ends and ‘disintegration’ at various levels in the family, relatives, villages or neighbourhood, community, and so on. In this situations, although the students are being metaphorically depicted as a homogenous section, they too suffer from the same tendency of tensions and disintegrations amongst themselves. This does not meant that there cannot be any kind of tactical ‘integrity’ amongst those who share common ideology and interest. In this regards, I believe, there can be utopian idealism to homogenise the heterogeneous fragments into a permanent unity. This is a fantasy and cannot happen in the real world at the wink of an eye. Where to begin with the unity initiative and how to begin it will involve organisational efforts, which will be resented by others who do not uphold the same agenda. However, those who think that they are in the right path in their own design, they may attempt to integrate more numbers on their side. This is the only role that different sections of students may attempt to do, in their own ways for different agenda.

 

TNT: Northeast region has been facing an identity crisis for a long time now. What’s your take on that?

Dr. Malem: Identity crisis or any kind of crisis is not an exception to what is being labelled as the Northeast. Since we are ‘peripheral’ part of India, we are like the limbs or the foot that belong to the lower strata of the Varna social order; that is, the Indian rulers do not intend to place us above them, but they need to ‘tame’ us to be obedient to fulfil their geo-strategic and commercial interests in our land. Our land and resources have been expropriated from us to enrich their profit. We are forced to remain silent under militarisation and draconian laws such as the Armed Forces Powers Act. Since we are being treated in this manner for more than six decades; we have realised that our problem is not created by us. On the contrary, it is they who are placing the onus of their problem on us. In this contradiction between ‘us’ and ‘them’; it is for Delhi, that is, the hub of power and brains, to wisely think and extend the warm hands of friendship to solve the problem without causing unwanted bloodshed and humiliation on us. This will be the first step towards resolving what many have blindly interpreted as identity crises in the Northeast.

 

TNT: What are the issues that students leader can take up in contemporary time?

Dr. Malem: There are couple of issues that require urgent attention. Some of those are: (a) Campaign against violation of human rights by the State actors and non-state criminals; (b) Campaign against drug addiction and for adequate rehabilitation of the addicts; (c) Resistance against population invasion by the outsiders and destructive projects; (d) Resistance against militarisation in the residential areas and places of daily economic activities. (e) Campaign for community economic programmes towards achieving sustainable development and for employment generation; (e) Campaign for expansion of State investment in the medical sector and adequate medical allowances and facilities to the needy persons.

 

TNT:  Do you think that student politics is fading away in the Northeast now?

Dr. Malem: Students are born and brought up in the families, which in turn are the units of a larger society. Anything that affected the society affected the individual and vice versa. In other words, there is an interplay of personal, social and political. Since the rulers behave politically, their actions will be politically either receptive or dissented by different sections; which in totality constitute an overarching political situation, from where an individual can never escape without playing some roles in it.. There are some sayings in Manipuri, “when the house is burning will the student inside it remain reading? When the stomach is hungry and life is threatened will the student affected by it remain reading? Students are the pillar of the society; they must act politically for their future.” To which direction the majority bulk of the students will go is a different issue. Different sections will adopt their own agenda and style of politics. In whatever style or agenda, student politics always persist.

 

**

Questionnaire by Dhiraj Sarma, Senior Editor, Northeast Today.

Responses by Malem Ningthouja, Campaign for Peace & Democracy (Manipur).

Dated July 20, 2015.

AIFF`s Women Footballer of the year: Ng Bala

By Samarjit Yen The state women football team is undergoing hectic preparation under the watchful eye of Coach, Langam Chaoba for the ensuing 35th National Games in Kerala this month.

By Samarjit Yen

The state women football team is undergoing hectic preparation under the watchful eye of Coach, Langam Chaoba for the ensuing 35th National Games in Kerala this month. Imphal Free Press requested Ngangom Bala Devi, the 25-year-old skipper of the team for a brief chat, to which she happily agreed. She recently got the coveted title of `Best Footballer of the Year 2014`™, awarded by the Asia International Football Federation. Born to Ngangom Manihar and Ng (O) Memma Devi of Irengbam Mamang Leikai of Bishnupur District, Bala has three siblings.

It is almost the same story with other women footballers of the state. Bala started playing football among the boys of her locality from an early age. Currently an employee of the Manipur Police Department, amidst her demanding schedule as a sportsperson, she has completed her graduation from Oinam College of Nambol in science stream.

Her first foray into the game at the National level was taking part in the Under-19 Women`™s Championship held in Assam in 2002. There she was declared the best player of the championship. Being a striker of the team, Bala plays swift attacking football. She was awarded with the same title in the following year as well, held in Uttaranchal in 2003.

There has been no looking back for Bala. In 2003, Bala was the best scorer in the U-17 Women National Championship. Her first international play was in Korea republic in AFC`™s U-17 held in 2005. She was declared the `Best Player`™ in the 1st South Asian Football Federation Women`™s Football Championship held in Bangladesh in the year 2010. This was Bala`™s first international title.

She also achieved the `Best Player`™ title in the 15th Senior Women`™s Championship 2007 held in Orissa. Again in the same year, Bala was the `Best Goal Scorer`™ in the 20th Senior Women`™s Championship held in Assam by scoring 29 goals in 7 matches.

IFP: How`™s the preparation going on?

Bala: We are confident of winning the gold medal in the National Games. Though we haven`™t got enough time for coaching and practice, it could have been better the camp is conducted for at least three months. In that way we can be more equip on the tactical part of the game as well the dynamics of the team. But we are ready to give excellent performance.

IFP: We wish you good luck. Tell us; under whose coaching did you started playing in the state and the national level?

Bala: Thank you. Well, I started playing under coaches like Jogeshwor and Shyam for the state level tournaments. For the national level, I played under coach Ekendro. They have been helping me in shaping up my football career.

IFP: And what about family support?

Bala: I should say I have been lucky to a have a family who encourage me so well in taking up sports as a career. On top of that my father was also a footballer. He has been encouraging me to play football since I was young.

IFP: Could you share your view on women football in the state?

Bala: To be frank, the state is now facing shortages of women footballers. I think one of the important reasons is there is less number of football tournaments for women as compared to man. It is true that Manipuri women dominate in Indian football, but on the other hand we need more tournaments to groom the youngsters. To simply put, we need more encouragement in various aspects. Women footballers are not getting enough encouragement as compared with male.

IFP: A few tips to the upcoming women footballers`¦

Bala: Dedication, discipline, and respect for the game. One should always try to learn from the instructors and the seniors, if not it is hard to succeed.

Club Muzik’s Aritisia – Interview with The Dirty Strikes, Imphal Music Band

Club Muzik’s ARTISIA voice of the stars Interview with The Dirty Strikes  The Dirty Strikes is a Post-Punk, Indie Rock Band from Manipur.  The Dirty Srikes Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Dirty-Strikes/101724996544287 Club

Club Muzik’s Aritisia – Interview with The Dirty Strikes, Imphal Music Band

Club Muzik’s Aritisia – Interview with The Dirty Strikes, Imphal Music Band

Club Muzik’s ARTISIA voice of the stars
Interview with The Dirty Strikes

 The Dirty Strikes is a Post-Punk, Indie Rock Band from Manipur.

 The Dirty Srikes Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Dirty-Strikes/101724996544287

Club Muzik:Q1. How do you relate the word meaning of The Dirty Strikes to the band?

 TDS – Quite a question everytime we give our answer to interview, this is the very fast question we have to face all the time Why the name The Dirty Strikes Well as we came from all different background we share a common thing at the end and thats the music. Being a youth of Imphal we wanna do something different from others which no one had experienced. Here we want people to hear something new so back in 2010 Jan we come out in this name The Dirty Strikes an Indie, post-punk band and not to forget we love and respect dirty people they are very original.

The Dirty Strikes is a Post-Punk,Indie Rock Band from Manipur

The Dirty Strikes is a Post-Punk, Indie Rock Band from Manipur

 

Club Muzik: Q2. Where do the band usually hang out? Tell us some of the best places you usually hang out here in Manipur with band mates?

TDS – Most of the time we hang out at Chumthang Studio, Nagamapal where we usually jam and apart from this we hang out in this awesome place called A2Z, Kwakeithel what a place people are really energetic

there, good vibes , tasty food, delicious tea and yes the ower Tamo Donald he is such a music lover and we connect easily . Do visit sometime if you haven’t touch your feet there. All smile!!!

 

Club Muzik:Q3. What were the responses from fans to your debut music video, Good Damaged Girl?

TDS – When we started performing as a band the music scene that time was kind of down but we never stop we believed in ourself and our music, we hold our ground and as a reason of that we made this video Good Damaged Girl we don’t wana take the credit alone we like this thanks our fans,family,manager and everyone and yes it was quite a success oh and thanks to you (ClubMuzik) for hosting the releasedshow at Classic hotel.

 

Club Muzik: Q4. To get the perfect taste of the musical sound we need to the rightmusical equipment’s. Tell us about the best things you would wanted to givethe perfect touches to your type of music or share us if you already havewhat you need the best?

TDS – It depend on modern sound equipment’s.Every now and then new equipment’s are emerging. The dexterity of the sound engineer is also afactor to determine the perfectness of the performance. In case of

Studiorecording also novelty of the studio equipment’s are also afactor.

 

Club Muzik: Q5. A part of the band but not seen on frontlines, share us about behindthe scene functioning and operations of the band?

TDS – Well this day we are staying low as our drummer is at Delhi sowe are just preparing ourself for some big fest this year outsideManipur. But we feel good to see some new Indie’s band from Imphal nowwe can say we are not alone.

 

Club Muzik: Q6. From the band’s point of view what is indie music and how is the indiefans in the country as you experience at various gigs you participated inthe country?

TDS – Indie as we all know stand for Independent it’s started at 80′sand came to limelight in the 90′s. Well many musician have its ownexpression of Indie and when it comes to us we would like to say Indiemusic is very raw and honest music and it quite an experimental andlyrically it gives us something which can’t be express anyway trylistening some www.Reverbnation.com/thedirtystrikes. Thanks youSince the day we first hit the stage we are getting positive vibes yeah negative vibes too truth to be told and yes performing outside ourstate has a different taste recently we played at Bombay now (Mumbai)for Vans fresh off the wall you won’t believe us folks what a crowddancing,singing our songs,trying to get fotos with us and lotsainterview we were welcome like anything like this only wherever weplayed we smile we connect we get new fans. And lastly once we playedfor a Radio in Chennai F.M radio damn when the RJ keeping saying theseboys from Manipur is awesome we were all like you know damn.

 

Club Muzik: Q7. What are the fames you enjoy being in a band from the rest of yourfriends who don’t in schools and institutions you all attended?

TDS – Fames sounds cool really cool for your kind information we are still the regular kids hanging with our folks talking, laughing and so on and on but its our fans who thought we are famous we are but as you know we are very down to earth and got lots of sense of humour people thought we got lotsa ego’s and false pride and the truth is we dint/don’t got anyway know us and you will know people. Tell you an episode when we were watching Hoobastank at Shillong some folks ( Manipuri’s ) came to us and was bowing to us saying respect and we were ordinary people we hug each other and thanks them for supporting us through up’s and down’s .

 

Club Muzik: Q8. The band had played and attended some of the best music events in the country. How do you prepare and set yourselves for these gigs?

TDS – Each and every gigs big or small got thier own taste as we know thanks to Chumthang Studio for their times with us the most important thing for every gigs is how we fix out setlist and how we delivered that to the particular crowd till now we are doing our best D.A.M fest at Pondicherry was really tuff playing in front of NIFT, Chennai student but at the end of the gigs we all enjoy and got to meet so many beautiful fans and people.

 

Club Muzik: Q9. What do each one of you wanted to be in your professional life or what do you do apart from music?

TDS – Well if we aren’t wrong we are doing professional work so far thought we dint get enough still we can buy bread for ourselves butter is on the way. (Laugh). Everyone is studying now Kendy doing LLB 4sem, Naoba, Bom and Tom studying BA in different stream and yes Uma is in Delhi doing videography once he is done we are thinking of making a home video let’s see how far we can kick the ball.

 

 Club Muzik: Q10. How independent is the band in terms of composing, looks, getting gigs, decision making, management and the likes?

TDS – Composing songs isn’t easy tell you something we fight for the better of our band and its quite effective lyrically we used to keep as simple as possible so that everyone can enjoy and dance it’s kind of friendly music . The most important part is the look andoutfits yeah we look skinny jeans, chucks shoes, leather jacket, messy hair these is how we represent The Dirty Strikes and everyonelove our simple style and who we are. Getting gigs wasn’t that muchtuff to us thanks to our Manager Nirjeet Chakpram (7streetwalkers)Rishu Singh (Mumbai) Ennui.bomb and Bode (Chumthang) meantimesometimes we played from our friend’s circle or relatives too so farenjoying. Decision making is the worse part we face so many differentopinion so many issues but we come with the right and good decisionall the time

 

Club Muzik: Q11. Apart from The Dirty Strikes what all are you good at musically?

TDS – Yeah everyone is musically sounds in their owe way and style.Everyone in our band can play Guitar, drums and some other instrument except our Vox he only play guitar and Tamborine.

 

Club Muzik: Q12. Share us those dreams you all have achieved till now by playing orbeing a part of the band before you all started?

TDS – Playing in a band sharing the same ideas is the biggestachievement apart from this yeah releasing an EP (first band to release an EP in Manipur) and for a band from Imphal featuring inRSJ and Rollingstone is one of those achievement. And the most amazingthing is giving an autograph in our photo in Ziro, Arunachal Pradesh was dream comes truth. Like to shortenhere.

 

Club Muzik: Q13. What do you give a s**t to?

TDS -We give a s**t to ourselves, our music, the way we play, the waywe write/sing/perform, our fans,family,friends and managers rest hellodogs bark. Lastly thanks to so much Club Muzik for your time keepdoing the good works The Dirty Strikes love you all.

 

The Dirty Srikes Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Dirty-Strikes/101724996544287
Questions & Revised by: Lukhendro Keisham
Co-ordinator: Ithoiba Potshangbam
Produced by: Club Muzik
Blog: www.ClubMuzikEvents.blogspot.in
Facebook Page: www.fb.com/ClubMuzikEvents

A rendezvous with Nameirakpam Chingkheinganba: Youngest Indian to scale Mount Everest

By: Khogen Khoibam “It was like a hallucination all the way along the higher altitude but in the end I was on top of the world.” IFP: You have been the

aaa

By: Khogen Khoibam

“It was like a hallucination all the way along the higher altitude but in the end I was on top of the world.”

IFP: You have been the talk of the nation. Tell me how did you make it to become the youngest Indian to scale Mount Everest?

Chingkheinganba: Actually, to stand on top of the Mount Everest has been an ultimate dream of my father, who is a founder member of Manipur Mountaineering and Trekking Association (MMTA) but he could not make it in his time due to lack of financial and technical support. Years later, he inspired me to do it and I made it to the top.

IFP: Would you share how did he inspire you as you are quite young for this expedition?

Chingkheinganba: To be true, I have never thought of myself to become a mountaineer but the inspiration was driven inside me spontaneously when I started my training in MMTA. After my first training programme, I came back home and recollected few old photos of my father. In the pictures I saw the real spirit of being a mountaineer and realised how hard my father had struggled to bring up mountaineering in Manipur. My father, Nameirakpam Tomba was one of the pioneer members of the mountaineering team from Manipur.

IFP: Do you really want this or this is because of your father’s background?

Chingkheinganba: I was quite a mischievous boy in my childhood and loved to do all kinds of adventurous activities though I was unable to discover myself those days. So many times my friends and I used to crash in the woods and bushes blindly and experienced many injuries too. Now I can figure out that it was in me from childhood and I am in a right position right now.

IFP: Share an experience about those days in the woods?

Chingkheinganba: Yeah…there had been a memorable day in my life when I was 13 years old, which even left a scar on the wrist of my left hand. By that time I have already gone through some training and the urge to climb hills and mountains was extremely intense that I was ready to face anything. So, two of my cousins and I went up a hillock and started cutting some woods but I ended up with a serious injury on my wrist. Being scared to let my parents know about it, we three went to RIMS directly and had a stitch by borrowing money from one of the friends. We had to walk 11 km to reach home but one of the cousins fainted suddenly and I had to carry him too all along the way.

IFP: So your stamina is quite interesting, how did you develop it?

Chingkheinganba: I started my first training session when I was 11 years old and I was extremely weak in the beginning. To be true, it is good to watch Superhero animation or cartoon on T.V. Somehow Superheroes inspire a lot to gain more energy (…laugh) and it actually happened to me. And moreover, when I saw one of my instructors climbing up the hill so easily, the desire to become strong grew more. After that, there was no looking back and I started to practice running every early morning at home. Gradually upgrading my running routine with push-ups and other exercises, my target was to run continuously 6 hours a day. I kept in my mind that only then I will be able to climb Mount Everest and eventually I built up enough stamina.

IFP: Tell us your experience so far in MMTA?

Chingkheinganba: MMTA is one of the best Associations and the training programmes here are immensely effective. It is not all about only mountaineering here, in fact the trainers do not simply train but they identify our specific areas in which we are to be trained. The adventurous sports are classified on Air, Water and Land, for example, Rafting, Sea Diving for Water, Trekking, Caving, Mountaineering for Land and Paragliding, Paramotor for Air, etc.

IFP: What about financial support?

Chingkheinganba: We always get financial support. Like for the Mount Everest Expedition, we were aided by the Northeast Council with Rs. 2.5 lakhs.

IFP: How many participants were there for the Expedition?

Chingkheinganba: A total of 16 participants, in which three of them were not mountaineers, a Medical Doctor, a Base Camp Manager and a Team Leader. They played much important roles in communication, management and medical aid, without which all the mountaineers would not be able to accomplish the main target to reach the peak.

IFP: Heard about someone got sick in the middle of the expedition?

Chingkheinganba: Yes, actually there were two members from Manipur who had medical issue and they could not carry on with the expedition.

IFP: It must have been quite a tough task to reach the peak, share us your experience?

Chingkheinganba: It was like a hallucination all the way along the higher altitude but in the end I was on top of the world. This was the first northeast expedition in the year 2013, which we started from Manipur on February 25 and came back home on June 5. Among the mountaineers, there were three girls from Arunachal, Meghalaya and Manipur, and rest were boys from Assam, Mizoram, Meghalaya, Sikkim and Manipur. Each mountaineer was guided in every step by a Sherpa, a local Nepali who knows most of the nook and corners of the mountains. The task starts from Base Camp to Camp 1, followed by Camp 2, Camp 3 and Camp 4, which is also called the Death Zone and after Camp 4, the extreme hardship begins.

Well, there had been much hardship, like shortage of water and oxygen, going through the Death Zone where I saw many death bodies lying, the fatal glaciers and Jet stream that nearly carried away each one of us. On the mountains, everyone was concerned of their own lives and own survival, even the Sherpas, in some sort of times. While on the way, everyone lost contacts and I did what I was meant to do and kept on climbing, sometimes I slept while walking. Area by area I continued and suddenly I saw the peak and I cried seeing my destination in front of me, but it was not at all near too. After crossing all the remaining areas, finally I reached the peak and I did not believe that I was there. I prayed to God and cried in joy. And then, all I could feel was a feeling like heaven and the giant shadow of the Himalayas was covering everything when I looked down.

IFP: Sounds heavenly, so did you wish to stay there little longer?

Chingkheinganba: Of course! And I felt really sad thinking that I have to go down again.

IFP: Great! So what is next coming up after Mount Everest Expedition?

Chingkheinganba: Well, I have a project in my mind to form a cycling team and cycle all through the northeast India, to convey the message of peace and harmony among everyone and let all the people aware of the hardship we face when there is an economic blockade and other of issues of boundaries of land and politics.

IFP: Apart from adventure sports, what do you love to do?

Chingkheinganba: A good dose of music. Sometimes I play guitar and have a good time.

IFP: Does your mother support you like your father?

Chingkheinganba: My mother, N. Sabitri is also from sports background. She used to be an archer and a Gold Medalist in archery.

IFP: Does the world of adventure sports affect your normal life?

Chingkheinganba: Hard to say exactly, but yes it affects my academic career somehow and in times, pretty hard to balance but ultimately this is what I do and I live for it.

IFP: Finally, what is your opinion on the issue of intoxication in Manipur?

Chingkheinganba: Well, intoxication is one of the biggest issues in the State and most of the youngsters are drowning into it blindly. I think there is a strong need for awareness programmes to be conducted consistently, which should include importance of sports too. Sports world is very competitive and once a person is hooked by the sense of competition in sports, he or she will automatically become health conscious. For example, MMTA is playing a major role to divert the minds of many drug crazed youngsters.

Melodious Mangka

  By Khogen Khoibam ‘Pena is like my friend. Pena accompanies me when I am lonely’ IFP: Who is Mangka and what is she? Mangka: It all started with the background of

IFP_July 19

 

By Khogen Khoibam

‘Pena is like my friend. Pena accompanies me when I am lonely’

IFP: Who is Mangka and what is she?

Mangka: It all started with the background of art in our family and the organisation of my father. Dancers and musicians used to come frequently and practice at our home mingling with my father and I was somehow drawn into it. Sometimes, I used to sneak out and practice dance.

I was in 5th standard, knowing my strong inclination in dance and music, my father once asked me whether I was really interested in music, and I replied ‘yes’ and then he took me to Grandma Thoinu and my music training was started. And to come over to Pena, it had been always there in our family and I was fascinated by it since my childhood though I could not play it properly that time as I found it quite heavy too (…laugh) but my father being a Pena player, I got inspired from him and I gradually started to play it from my 6th standard under the training of Grandpa Khangembam Mangi. And that is how I am here now.

IFP: Who is your role model or inspiration?

Mangka: My father, of course!

IFP: How do you manage your time to practice Pena with your academic?

Mangka: Of course Pena has to be practiced consistently but I also need to go to college regularly and I just need one hour in the morning and in the evening to practice Pena, followed by coaching a few students, and that is enough for me.

IFP: What is Pena to you?

Mangka: Pena is like my friend. Pena accompanies me when I am lonely and I just play it and sing and become happy.

IFP: Being an artist, do you find yourself different from others?

Mangka: I am different because what I am doing is different and I am proud of it but I do not have the pride and never thought that ‘I am the best’.

IFP: What else do you love in the form of art apart from playing Pena?

Mangka: I love theatre and for sure dance and music and there are many I would love to do and know, for example I want to learn Piano.

IFP: Tell me about your experience in participating Asia Pacific Broadcasting Radio Song Festival 2014?

Mangka: Well, I would say it was great experience and a hectic journey too. A girl and I were selected from Manipur by All India Radio (AIR), Imphal and we were sent to Delhi. There, all the participants from several states of India were made to play their tracks and after listening to them by the panel of judges, a male artist from Bangalore and I were selected and sent to Colombo. There again, the members of ABU considered our tracks and I was finally selected for ABU Radio Song Festival.

Before heading for Colombo, AIR organised a special concert for me in Chennai and during my stay there, I had to cope up with change in food and weather and eventually I became too hectic by the time I reached Colombo. Deprived of energy, I had to go directly to Stein Studios for rehearsal but somehow I revived my energy when I took over the stage and rehearsal was performed perfectly.

Next day was the main event of two hours, in which other seven countries, Brunei, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, Australia, South Korea and Pakistan and three artists from Sri Lanka, were to perform.

(Her mother, Rebika Mayanglambam added in between): Mangka was selected out of around 50 songs by different artists throughout India and after she was selected, we had some issues financially and government of India did not look upon it but Bijaya Yumlembam, Programme Officer, AIR and the editor of Hueyen Lanpao, helped her with Rs. 60,000 and she was able to make it to Colombo.

IFP: Heard about the appreciations for you in the event, how did it all go?

Mangka: About the performance, people were amazed when I represented India as my look is oriental and it was quite contrasting with the people’s expectation. Most of the people were not ready to accept when I said “I am an Indian” and the irony is that, no one knew where is Manipur (…laugh) and I had to re-locate Manipur in the world map. But I was all the time loved and liked by the people and particularly from Asian countries like Japan, Vietnam appreciated me immensely. We shared a good rapport between us.

IFP: What is the actual genre of music you perform? People say it is as folk music, do you agree?

Mangka: There has always been a misconception by the people and I have been waiting for long to clarify that what I perform or sing is not a folk song or music but it is based on the folk music, with some upgradation like mixing with guitar. The songs are composed by my father and lyrics are also written by him. Real folk music or song is totally different from what I am doing.

(Her mother added): Mangka mostly focuses on the song which is powered by Pena but now it is becoming more of a Pena and many young boys and girls are inspired by her and have joined the Pena workshop on every Thursday and Sunday at Lai Hui, an organisation run by Mangka’s father, Mayanglambam Mangangsana.

IFP: While you are on the stage, your performance is outstanding. Do you make it that way or it just comes with the mood?

Mangka: Well, the movement and the way of performance are just spontaneous and the gestures might have come out from my dancing skills. Even if I plan for something to do on the stage, music always dominates it and everything goes with the mood and flow of the music. But to add up, sometimes it depends on the lyrics too, as how to demonstrate the meaning of the song with the movements and gestures of the hands and body.

IFP: Has there been any incident in your life that strongly inspired you to do this?

Mangka: I am into this field of music by my own choice and I am not doing this by someone’s influence. My inspiration is my father and I love all the performances by Lai Hui…truly and madly I love it (…laugh).

IFP: Tell me some of the criticisms you heard about you?

Mangka: There are lots, many people criticise that what I am doing is something a granny should do but I do not care and I am not ashamed of it. People even said that I will not be able to concentrate in studies and my academic will be in disaster but I have proved that wrong when I passed out my matriculation in first division and later on again in intermediate, now I am pursuing my graduation. Still there are lots of people who back-bites about me but fortunately I find more people who encourage me and I am happy about it.

(Her mother added): There is need from the family side to support effectively so as to balance the academic and artistic career and we never force her to top in studies and my daughter is quite tactful to manage everything.

IFP: Is there any upcoming projects in the pipeline?

Mangka: Well, there is going to be a music album in the month of August which is produced by Our Village, which is runned by Oinam Doren. The music album will be made by funds from the crowd from wherever possible and there will be nine songs of pure folk music.

(Her mother added): Oinam Doren has been following and capturing performances of Mangka since her childhood and she had also sung for his film ‘My Hands’.

IFP: Lastly, what is your view on people’s attitude towards an artist?

Mangka: Yes, most of the people commonly think of an artist as some kind of outrageous being and this is because usually artists of our olden years were somehow academically weak though they were artistically very high, may be they must have had a hard time to cope up and balance with the society but now time has changed with more opportunities opening up. And this does not mean that everything is framed for you and to be an artist is to work hard with maximum support from the family side too, which is much needed.

Finally, to share about the people’s attitude for an artist, I would say still there is a biased nature and more preferences are given more to the people who work as government servants. As for example, most of the parents prefer their children to become a doctor or an engineer, and I am not criticizing them, it is alright if they really want that. As for me, I want to become a professor or a scholar (…laughs loud) but I am an artist too.

 

Interview with team ‘My Japanese Niece’

The post Interview with team ‘My Japanese Niece’ appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

Interview with team “My Japanese Niece” By W Rorrkychand Singh for KanglaOnline “Feeling really happy……….as per scheduled we have started mock shooting”- Mohen. Almost after 2 years of arduous research and paper work, team ‘My Japanese Niece’ (MJN) is all … Continue reading

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The post Interview with team ‘My Japanese Niece’ appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

Interview with team “My Japanese Niece”
By W Rorrkychand Singh for KanglaOnline

“Feeling really happy……….as per scheduled we have started mock shooting”- Mohen.

L-R: Junichi Kajioka, Mohen Naorem and Yu Asada

L-R: Junichi Kajioka, Mohen Naorem and Yu Asada

Almost after 2 years of arduous research and paper work, team ‘My Japanese Niece’ (MJN) is all set for light, camera and action. Probably for the first time in Manipur, we are undergoing mock shooting, director of the upcoming war documentary movie, Mohen Naorem informed in a candid interview with entertainment reporter of www.kanglaonline.com.

Here is an excerpt of the interview with the director along with Junichi Kajioka, the main protagonist of MJN……..

KO: How are you preparing for your role?

Junichi: Most of the Japanese soldiers died because of hunger not because of malaria, cholera or any other epidemic diseases. I’m playing 25 to late 40s in the film and when I look like a hunger starved Japanese soldier I will be in my late 40s. Dieting is on and at the same time hectic practices ahead to portray the same youth to be seen as an old man.

KO: Something about the Budget

Mohen: Earlier, while we were scripting the first script, without any war scene it was estimated around 1-2 crore but it has multiplied only to bringing an actual war background. The realistic aspects of the film could do only with locations, costumes and properties like tank, explosions, sophisticated weapons, helicopter, antic, gigantic stage etc….. and here comes the need to hike the budget.

Director Mohen Naorem in Bangkok for MJN shooting

Director Mohen Naorem in Bangkok for MJN shooting

KO: How would you incur the budget from the present Manipuri film market?

Mohen: No, no its an international venture, already talked with Japanese ambassador for tie up and it aims at international markets; there are plenty of it. Interestingly, the Ambassador was touched with the story line that he assured to make use of the movie for promotion of peace around the globe.

KO: Comparatively, it’s a small budget with other international ventures; what do you really expect from MJN?

Junichi: I don’t think about budget; I don’t decide the film to involve depend on its budget. MJN is special and a meaningful project- without doubt it would strengthen the bonding between Japan and Manipur. It has a good subject matter and it’s very rare to find such film; we cannot see such project anywhere, it does not matter how much he (Mohen) pays for me.
Most of the war film is based on “who killed and who rose,” but this film is something that would message across to the world about peace and “help even in the war front to save lives”.

Mohen: Luckily, there would not any draught for funds as long as blessings of supporters exist; peace-lover individuals and even from overseas have join and ready to lend their hands in this project.

My Japanese Niece - cover photo

My Japanese Niece – cover photo

KO: About the rumour- MJN is a joint project with some foreign Embassies, how far it’s true?

Mohen: No, it’s not. But we met Japanese Embassy in New Delhi and they also welcomed such an effort to promote international peace, love and solidarity. They are actually looking forward about MJN and even hope to make use of the films to promote their diplomatic relation with Korea and China.

Apart from it they were so anxious and at the same time serious about MJN, that if it turn out to be another blow to the history of Japanese. So they even asked me to make some good side of them. When, some Japanese political affair officers came to Manipur they literary went on asking about this movie to some high level officials including our Chief Secretary and officials of state Tourism department, “One such movie is coming from your state, what would be the consequences of it?” I came to know about the gravity of their curiosity about MJN through Indo-Japan Friendship Association, Imphal. In fact is- they want to cross some political limits with MJN, where political affair does not succeed so far.

KO: Movie of such genre might require lots of research and field works?

Mohen: Yes! Work started since 2011 and now research and field study is almost at the stage of culmination. Feeling really happy………. As per scheduled we have started mock shooting.
KO: Mock shooting, is it so necessary?

Mohen: We believe on perfection, though the film is from Manipur, audience around the globe is waiting to witness it.

KO: Where will the film be shot….?

Mohen: The film will be shot at Manipur, Bangkok and Japan. The war scenes will be shot at Bangkok. Initially it would be shooting in Japan and some part of Indo-Myanmar border.

My Japanese Niece - official poster - Courtesy: https://www.facebook.com/MyJapaneseNiece

My Japanese Niece – official poster – Courtesy: https://www.facebook.com/MyJapaneseNiece

KO: MJN a brainchild of whom?

Mohen: It’s team effort. See, not only acting in the film, Junichi is helping me as production manager, making the cost effective so that it can be have a good move in a low budget as well as selection of location, drafting of script etc…throughout each and every development of the film. But the main location is- Manipur. The Manipur scenes will be shot at Kamray Ching, and Mongjam.

KO: Lastly, any other Manipuris in the film?

Mohen: There are some, apart from well-know faces like Bala and Abenao, we are in search of new talents. Abenao would be seen in a challenging role.

KO: Tentative date of release?

Mohen: On the 70th anniversary of the battle of Imphal in the year 2014, its gonna be a big incident.

Highlights:
Production: Legend Studio Production
Director: Naorem Mohen
Assistant Directors:
1) Fanny Fandora (French)
2) Sheria Vallah (Iran)
3) Deepsikha Poddav (Bengali)
4) Robert Megha (Manipuri)
Music: Luna Luna (Japanese)
Camera: Elfassy (French) (CNBC, Discussion)
Costume: Japanese USA based
Genre: Drama/War/History

Photos courtesy: Rorrky, MJN Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/MyJapaneseNiece)

 

My Japanese Niece - official poster - Courtesy: https://www.facebook.com/MyJapaneseNiece
My Japanese Niece - cover photo
L-R: Junichi Kajioka, Mohen Naorem and Yu Asada
Director Mohen Naorem in Bangkok for MJN shooting

The post Interview with team ‘My Japanese Niece’ appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

Tete-a-Tete With Ningthouja Lancha on Manipuri Film Industry

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The post Interview: Manipuri Film Actress – Abenao(Sonia Elangbam) on Career, Culture and Experience appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

By: W Rorrkychand Singh In a candid conversation with Manipuri Film Actress Abenao (Sonia Elangbam), who is better known by her stage name; Abenao reveals about her acting career, the secret of her beauty and many more hush-hush to W Rorrkychand … Continue reading

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Dr Thangkhanpiang Hatzaw: Work with love, care and commitment

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The post Dr Thangkhanpiang Hatzaw: Work with love, care and commitment appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

By Hatneichonghoi IMPHAL, July 15: A man of extraordinary talents and skill, Dr Thangkhanpiang Hatzaw is man of integrity when it comes to his patients. A man with the golden fingers, he has performed many a complicated appendectomy operations. He … Continue reading

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Tete-a-Tete With: Mohen Naorem

By: W Rorrkychand Singh It’s said that love knows no barriers and it seems that in the case of Manipuri filmmaker Mohen Naorem, the medium of cinema knows no limit. Mohen, who is better known for his 2010 movie “School Karushi” (Let Us Study) is …

By: W Rorrkychand Singh It’s said that love knows no barriers and it seems that in the case of Manipuri filmmaker Mohen Naorem, the medium of cinema knows no limit. Mohen, who is better known for his 2010 movie “School Karushi” (Let Us Study) is among the few filmmakers giving Manipuri film industry a new […]

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