CM sets eyes on first 100 days

IMPHAL, Apr 20: Taking cues from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement regarding works and projects to be taken up within the first 100 days in office, Chief Minister N Biren is also planning a similar venture. According to a source, the Chief Minister met the different Secretaries of various Departments today afternoon and minutely discussed […]

IMPHAL, Apr 20: Taking cues from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement regarding works and projects to be taken up within the first 100 days in office, Chief Minister N Biren is also planning a similar venture. According to a source, the Chief Minister met the different Secretaries of various Departments today afternoon and minutely discussed […]

CM sets eyes on first 100 days

IMPHAL, Apr 20: Taking cues from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement regarding works and projects to be taken up within the first 100 days in office, Chief Minister N Biren is also planning a similar venture. According to a source, the Chief Minister met the different Secretaries of various Departments today afternoon and minutely discussed […]

IMPHAL, Apr 20: Taking cues from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement regarding works and projects to be taken up within the first 100 days in office, Chief Minister N Biren is also planning a similar venture. According to a source, the Chief Minister met the different Secretaries of various Departments today afternoon and minutely discussed […]

Rs 294 lakh granted to Centre for North East Studies and Policy Research, JMI for research and upgradation

The North Eastern Council (NEC) has sanctioned a grant of Rs 294 lakh for the upgradation of the Centre for North East Studies and Policy Research (CNESPR) in Jamia Millia Islamia under an Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed between the two sides. The Shillong-based NEC, which comes under the Ministry of Development of North East […]

The North Eastern Council (NEC) has sanctioned a grant of Rs 294 lakh for the upgradation of the Centre for North East Studies and Policy Research (CNESPR) in Jamia Millia Islamia under an Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed between the two sides. The Shillong-based NEC, which comes under the Ministry of Development of North East […]

BSc (Health) and BSc (Sports Coaching) likely in Sports Univ

Imphal, Aug 1 (DIPR) : The Central Government will be establishing the National Sports University at Yaithibi Khunou of Thoubal district. The University will bridge critical gaps that exist in our present system. The University aims to commence with courses in BSc (Health) and BSc (Sports Coaching). In addition, the local presence of highly skilled […]

The post BSc (Health) and BSc (Sports Coaching) likely in Sports Univ appeared first on KanglaOnline.

Imphal, Aug 1 (DIPR) : The Central Government will be establishing the National Sports University at Yaithibi Khunou of Thoubal district. The University will bridge critical gaps that exist in our present system. The University aims to commence with courses in BSc (Health) and BSc (Sports Coaching). In addition, the local presence of highly skilled […]

The post BSc (Health) and BSc (Sports Coaching) likely in Sports Univ appeared first on KanglaOnline.

Not Easy Not Too Tough: The Manipur Chapter

By Urmila Chanam I chuckle to myself re membering the optimistic ambition in me when one day I sat till midnight to make the roadmap, weeks before I descended in

By Urmila Chanam
I chuckle to myself re membering the optimistic ambition in me when one day I sat till midnight to make the roadmap, weeks before I descended in Manipur to roll out my global campaign on educating women about their bodies and menstruation.

I had several local NGOs and individual partners and a host of journalist friends based in Manipur which/who were keen to help me put my foot on the ground and do my thing. That made me confident as I drew into the map small red pins on locations spanning across four districts and five major halts in the state.

When I finally took the flight to Manipur and walked out of the arrivals in Tulihal Airport, I was met with my family with hugs, kisses and tears of reunion and a strange feeling in the deep recesses of my mind that told me, it was not going to be easy.

I also felt this would be a life changing experience.

My understanding of my home state was to be of little consequence to what would soon unfold in the next 30 days of working in Manipur. Everything I understood about my native so far was soon going for a re-alignment- some for the bad and mostly for the good.

My first day of work in Manipur was a wet, slightly cold and pleasant day in April this year in a village/leikai called Khabam Makha Leikai in Imphal West District. It was raining cats and dogs and I worried if people would turn up. Being always conscious to not get late in reaching the field site, I generally aim to reach two hours before the programme that helps me get acquainted with the terrain, community, surroundings, my own team and our arrangements for the training, refreshment or toilet facilities for the participants.

On this particular day, I was not sure about my course of action. One one hand, I wanted to be just the way I have been with my field team in the other eight states I work in the country- coordinating every minute detail over the phone beginning from the wee hours of the morning while on the other hand, my mind was telling me to slow down- the culture here was so different.

I listened to my heart and took the back seat that day, completely relying on my local implementation partner and seeking the opportunity to observe how things worked here. I tried to not get involved in being responsible for all the aspects of the day. This was very unsettling to me.

My biggest learning in Manipur is that when people work together very little words are spoken and silence means acceptance, respect and agreement. In the many parts of the country and overseas, silence could mean hostility, non-cooperation and plain disagreement. What a difference, you see!

Suggestions, plans, instructions are met with silence and a gap in understanding that silence could easily result in conflict in implementation but I learnt this difference fast and chose to move on to the next apparent difference. Thank God, I did not use an abundance of words here.

When I landed on site, there was the huge playground of Ibemcha Girl’s High School and the community hall to choose from for holding the in-tent trainings for girls and women. The leikai locality people were asked to help with setting up the place and young and old men in good numbers came out of their house to erect the tent, put the chairs, arrange the carpets and the likes. Few of them rushed to their homes to fetch a stapler for holding the chart papers on the tarpaulin walls of the tent, few got ropes, still few others got other kind of items to make the place ready for the day. In no time where there had been no one, I was taken aback to see so many helping hands.

The only question asked to us was why were we doing this program and who would be the participants. No one asked for our credentials and identity. This was not a land of permits, requests for approval, brand building or marketing. Just an honest intent was of immense value here.

The second learning for me was to find such community cohesiveness, helpfulness and resourcefulness vested in each person in the community. While people who live in Manipur may not even notice the value in this particular trait, for someone who works outside in different cultures this positive quality is called community ownership and community support group system that our strategic and training manuals teach us to try and develop in communities where large interventions of development are to be implemented. Large funds are utilized to develop this quality in the communities that are to receive such projects and programmes with a belief that this is a pre requisite for the success of the intervention.

Manipur, I found, has already got that quality. Can we build systems and processes in this culturally receptive community? Can we choose development projects and programmes that are community owned, community led and community driven over individual or business models and run by the private sector?

Just walking over to the cha-dukaan or the tea shop to hold a casual conversation about the training, the topic and that we were looking out to mobilize all the girls and women in the community to come and benefit from it was sufficient to gather large numbers of girls and women who thronged to the tent from morning till late evening. The volunteers had to organize women in batches so they didn’t have to wait.

This is another take-away for me to understand that the community in Manipur is very closely-knit. While this is a great strength, it could also prove detrimental to implementation if not tread carefully. I made a mental note on this aspect as I looked ahead to the days in front of me in the field.

Okay so the tent was erected. The refreshments had arrived. I could see a good turnout of participants from the small opening of the tent where I was seated. I drank some water. My volunteers were doing a fantastic job of registering women and girls and keeping them engaged. I had only one anxiety. No matter how many trainings I might have given, the initial first few moments are always critical. These are the moments I struggle to break the inhibition, the shyness, the fear, the shame in each girl and woman I open the conversation with. Few communities and groups take an hour, some never quite come out of their shell and some open up in just few minutes of my effort.

Much to my surprise, I found that at KhabamLeikai I did not have to make any efforts to break the shyness or inhibition among women. From the time I started till the time I closed, girls and women bombarded me with queries, concerns, experiences and thoughts. The discussion was so rich and vibrant that I carry the satisfaction of having reached this locality in my campaign and empower women and girls with accurate information of their bodies.

The first woman who came in was accompanied by her adolescent daughter. She told me she used only cloth because she could not afford sanitary pads. While she was talking to me, her heavy gold bangles were making clinking sounds and my gaze went to the amount of ornaments she wore. For a woman spending Rs 30/- on an essential item which will improve her health is still a luxury in this region.

The women and girls waited in spite of the rain for their turn to get inside my tent to receive training. Women who had reached menopause disregarded any advice from volunteers that the training was targeted for girls and women who are menstruating and got in!

I gave individual attention to each and every one I met and found a unique connect with women in Manipur. My understanding of the person, their issues, their perspectives and aspirations got deepened from such a rich interface.

Women are so hungry for information on their bodies, health and periods. The women appear to need this space to discuss sex, family planning, spacing between children, medical termination of pregnancy, menstruation anomalies and their own opinions. There were no side-talks, no shy smiles and no delay in asking what they wanted to know. They spoke freely and they spoke till they finished.

Could this mean women on the whole here have no access to information? Is information of this kind only limited to health and medical practitioners? What is the level of performance of the Accredited Social Health Activists (the ASHAs) and other health outreach workers in the state?

I found the younger girls use sanitary pads and the older women use cotton cloth to absorb menstrual fluid. Several girls and women complained of itchiness, foul smelling white discharge, irregularity in period cycle and being reliant on painkillers for menstrual cramps. A relatively high incidence of medically terminated pregnancies (MTP) or abortion was noticed among married women and low usage of contraceptives by these women. Condoms, married women say, are not very popular in their community. One woman said,

‘I had to get abortions three times in the last two years as we had already had the number of children we wanted. My husband does not use a condom and I don’t know where to find female contraceptives. It has resulted in three unwanted pregnancies!’

The same woman had sever pigmentation on her face and complains of burning sensation in her stomach everyday which keeps her awake through the night.

I also found an alarming high percentage of married women who had their wombs removed. On the slight pretext of a cyst, the women are being advised to remove their womb before it turns cancerous. All these analysis have been done on the basis of the conversation and not based on documents of their medical history.

Why are women being advised to remove their wombs in the first sign of trouble? And what is the underlying cause of these women developing womb-related issues? These are questions that I find immensely interesting and worthy of observation over a period of time.

Few women also said that they never got treated for their concerns or went to a doctor.

“I thought what I was suffering was no big deal and not fatal. I was also anxious what the doctor would think!’

The best part of that day remains the crowd pressing in to enter the tent long after the sun had set and even in pitch darkness owing to load shedding on that particular day. I had to firmly announce the training to be ‘over’ to end the day even when there were many more waiting outside to talk to me. .

KhabamMakhaleikai in Imphal West district in Manipur will always remain close to my heart. As I walk ahead to reach more geographies and religious communities this year, I value my experience and learning that working in Manipur has given me to understand my people, my community better. This new found understanding has given me a deeper love and a firmer resolve to continue my work on educating women and girls in Manipur.

(Urmila Chanam is a consultant of knowledge management in HIV/AIDS working for a multilateral organization, FHI 360, managing a USAID project for Orphaned and Vulnerable Children. She also heads a global campaign ‘Breaking the Silence’ which is about menstrual hygiene management and banishing taboos around menstruation.Arecipient of the National Laadli Award on Gender Sensitivity in 2015, she has been working with agencies like World Pulse (USA), WSSCC (Geneva), Voices of Human Rights (USA), Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS),World Bank and the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO). Her singular effort in all her work is to connect with the grass-root and take forward real issues to a platform from where she can influence policy decisions.)

Yoga A Need of the Hour

By Dr. S. Kulachandra Singh Health is Wealth – Health is Happiness : The secret of happiness is excellent health and cordial inter personal relationship with all. There is no

By Dr. S. Kulachandra Singh

Health is Wealth – Health is Happiness :

The secret of happiness is excellent health and cordial inter personal relationship with all. There is no need to explain how essential it is to be healthy. In this modern world one has no time to fall sick and also one cannot afford to be sick, as the management of sick person is becoming very costly.

Sickness is rigorous imprisonment :

When one is sick no doubt the sick person suffers physically, mentally, socially and of course economically. But he is also indirectly responsible for the unhappiness of his close relations and employer. Sickness is a sort of rigorous imprisonment.

Health – Happiness are not commodities :

One must realise health or happiness are not commodities. They cannot be purchased in the market, or can be borrowed from someone. Once state of health is directly related to his life style – namely the diet, exercises, rest he takes and the attitude with which he lives. Medical care – namely – different varieties of medicines. Surgical techniques, vaccinations etc. can prevent certain types of diseases, but they cannot make you healthy. Health is totally an outcome of once living style.

WHO-WARNS

Many years back World Health Organisation had declared Health for all by 2000 AD while India had declared health for all by 1995. For this WHO had guided how to overcome malnutrition, supply clean drinking water, improve personal hygiene, vaccinations and inoculations. Family planning at all. These measures have helped to bring down certain germ oriented diseases. However there are certain Psycho-somatic diseases like Heart attack, Hypertension, Diabetes, Depression, Digestive System diseases are increasing in geometrical proportion and that too in so called educated and rich class of society. WHO has sent a warning to all developing countries especially Asian Countries like – India, that by 2020 to 2040, these countries are going to have diseases like – Coronary Artery diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, Cancer etc. like an epidemic and that too in the age group of 30 to 40. That means those who are now in the age group of 10 to 15 are the likely candidates of this epidemic

Tension Bomb is more dangerous than Nuclear Bomb :

We know that in Second World War when atom bombs were exploded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 5 to 6 lakhs of people died on the spot, and another 3 to 4 lakhs afterwards due to its after effect. But this happened once only. Since then no atomic bomb were exploded, nor there is any likelihood.

But very few are really aware that there is one main reason which is killing billions of people every year all over the World without any distinction of caste or race or religion or nationality, and that is Tension or Stress Bomb. WHO health report says every year fifteen million people die due to stress oriented problems like Heart disease, diabetes, cancer etc. and this figure is going to raise to 4 to 5 times by 2020.

It has been conclusively proud that these diseases are mainly due to faulty life style- namely –

1) Life full of uncontrolled mental tension.

2) Faulty diet – namely diet full of dairy products, Bakery products, Animal products/processed, refined bottled or tinned food and beverages.

3) Increasing vices like tobacco, liquor.

4) Lack of physical exercises, sedentary habits leading to obesity

5) Increasing pollution in Air, Water and Food.

These are called as “RISK” factors.

So, it is obviously one wants to avoid these diseases one has to change his life style from high tension to tranquility, take proper type of food, Exercise, rest and abstain from vices.

Here comes the role of Yoga :

The science of Ashtanga Yoga is the greatest contribution of the ancient Indian culture to humanity. One of the aims of Yogic practice is to understand the mind and discipline it. It helps to develop control over the mind activities and produces on state of Harmony or integration, what is called as Samadhi – a state of balance between body mind – spirit so called ‘I’. This harmony is essential for the health. This harmony which is mainly disturbed by mind actively produces a state called as Vyadhi or Vikshepa or a state of Diseased i.e. Not at ease.

In Yoga this state has been described on feeling of sorrow, weakness nervousness, increase in breathing rate are signs of Vikshepa or what we called as stress. This stress or Vikshepa condition is produced due to the production of negative emotional impulses like Anger, Fear, Anxiety, Frustration, Greed, Jealousy. So basic attempt is needed to stop producing negative emotional impulses, and convert the same into positive emotional pattern like love, friendship, companion, sharing delight and capacity to pardon.

Stress Management through Ashtanga Yoga.

The regular practice of all the yogic procedures of eight fold yoga system namely Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dharana, Dhyana, Samadhi supported by proper lacto-vegetarian diet, rest and necessary adequate exercises is known to produce perfect balance between body and mind. It has been objectively proved that effect of Asanas, Pranayama, Meditation is to normalize the functions of the body, internal body systems and mind together. It is emphatically stated by Janardana Swami in his book on Yoga.

If one practices Yoga regularly and as per his capacity he is assured of health, happiness and contentment. These claims have been objectively proud by scientific experiments also.

A) Dr. Herbert Benson, cardiologist of Harvard School of Medicine, USA, has proved after decades of experiment that continued practice of Meditation leads to “Relaxation Response characterized by (i) Lowering of pulse rate, breathing rate, reduction in increased blood pressure. (ii) Feeling of well being (iii) Improvement in general body resistance (iv) reducing the speed of Aging. (v) Reduces bad cholesterol level in the blood and improves the immune system.

B) In 1988-89 Dr. Dean Orrish, Cardiologist from California University of America has conclusively proved that combination of Yogic way of life namely change of lifestyle, abstinance from nicotine, proper-cholesterol free vegetarian diet regular exercise reopen the blocked coronary artery from 56 yo 62% within a period of one year. That is Yoga has the power of reversing the disease and it can By-pass the By-pass surgery provided all the above things are done together.

It has been further proved that regular practice of yogic procedures affects at all the levels of life namely physiological, psychological and spiritual.

C) The regular practice of Yogasanas is known to improve the suppleness of spine, mobility of joints, tones and reflex activity of muscles, the envious and lymphatic drainage of internal organs, and overall improves the general body resistance. Yogasanas are not just physical excercises, aimed to increase muscle bulk or power. On the contrary they help to keep the body weight near to normal, improves the flexibility and suppleness of spinal column and joints and endurance of muscle activity. This is very very essential to avoid or postpone degenerative disease of joints.

D) Pranayama is known to improve the breathing capacity developing proper control over mind and strengthen autonomous nervous system and develop proper coordination between conical and autonomous nervous system which ultimately helps to combat stress much more efficiently. In the ancient scriptures it is started.

If one practices Pranayama and other parts of yoga properly one can get rid of all diseases. But if one doesn’t practice any part of Yoga properly it can give rise to all diseases.

Hence, one should learn yoga from an experienced yoga teacher.

E) Asanas and Pramayamas are mainly known to improve the functioning of neuromusculo-grandularaxis the functioning of which is responsible for the internal Homeostasis a natural genternal body resistance.

F) Meditation i.e. to “Live With Attention Without Tension” helps to reduce the production of stress to a great extent and also helps to accept the unavoidable reality.

It is to be kept in mind that the science of Yoga never originated on a Therapy. However, the effect of total yogic living style has been proud to avoid, control and cure certain stress-oriented diseases. This therapy has to be accepted as a style of living. Just practicing same asanas or pranayams sometimes and neglecting other aspects of Yoga won’t do. Remember that only Asanas means not Yoga Therapy, or there are no particular asanas for particular diseases.

The beauty of this Yogic Therapy alias yogic way of living is, it treats the person as a whole. In yoga one does not treat a part of body like neck, back, heart, etc. It takes into account all aspects of living of an individual namely physical exercises, mental attitude, social relationship, spiritual awareness, diet and abstinence from vices. Thus it is a total holistic approach or Art of living. The purpose of this approach is not just to get rid of some diseases but also to improve the personality as a whole and enjoy the jubilant feeling of well being.

One must realize that Yoga Therapy cannot replace conventional medicine completely. However, one should not ignore Yoga Therapy. Both yoga and conventional therapy have to go together. To start with yoga can be introduced as an adjustment to other Therapy. Continued practice of Yoga way of living is known to reduce the need of medicines by 25% to 100% in 6 months to 2 years period. It is known that it can avoid surgical intervention in problems like ischeamic heart disease, backache, sinusitis, Dyspepsia at all. However, one must practice Yoga properly and regularly.

Yoga therapy does not involve mere practice of Yogasana or Pranayama only. One of the most important aspects of Yogic art of living is to follow the precepts of Yama. However one should behave in the society with other. These precepts are Truth, Nonviolence Nonstealing, Non-attachement and Brahmacharya, Control over all the sense organs and at individual level, (leanliness) attitude contentment or witnessing Self study, Self efforts realizsng the ultimate reality and to take proper lacto-vegetarian food.

The aims of these guiding principles are not to being any limitations on the freedom of a person but it helps to make oneself healthy and develop good relationship with others, which is the back bone of good quality of life.

Thus yogic way of living which involves all dimensions of life namely Diet, Exercise, Thoughts, speaking and Acts is a complete Holistic art of living. Stress Management is the by -products.

 

Beat Your Blood Pressure

By Dr Khushboo Shah Sawant If we are to talk about understanding the nitty-gritty of blood pressure, one will have to begin with the function of blood in the human

By Dr Khushboo Shah Sawant

If we are to talk about understanding the nitty-gritty of blood pressure, one will have to begin with the function of blood in the human body. Blood carries oxygen from the heart to the various parts of the body through blood vessels called as arteries and the term ‘blood pressure’ is the pressure on the walls of the arteries which is put by the heart while pumping blood into them. Every time the heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. You may have noticed blood pressure measurement having two set digits. They are the systolic and diastolic pressure. When the heart is pumping the blood into the arteries, the pressure is highest. This is known as the systolic pressure. The pressure when blood is not being pumped, or in between heart beats is the lowest, and is known as diastolic pressure. While the blood pressure of a person is known to change during the day, the normal accepted blood pressure is 120/80mmHg. Blood pressure is measured by an instrument known as a ‘sphygmomanometer’. It measures the blood pressure in units called millimeters of mercury (mmHg). It is measured by tying a cuff on the arm, after which the rubber cuff is inflated and blood pressure is checked on the mercury bulb. The newer machines have a digital recording of the blood pressure.

The ideal blood pressure of 120/80 has an acceptable window of + or – of 10mmHg and anything above that is known as ‘high blood pressure’ or hypertension. The lower limit is known as ‘low blood pressure’ or hypotension. The exact cause of hypertension is not known, however there are various factors which contribute as the risk factors, like smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, excessive salt intake, excessive consumption of alcohol, stress, advancing age, family heredity, long standing kidney illness etc. Sometimes hypertension is also caused during pregnancy. Often hypertension shows no symptoms, and so it has been labeled as the ‘silent killer’. A high blood pressure may be discovered only during a routine checkup. If a person experiences any symptoms like, a constant dull headache, dizziness, shortness of breath, trouble seeing normally or feeling pulsations over the neck or the temples then you must get your blood pressure checked, as these may be possible signs of the same. Hence, it is very important for those above the age of 35 years to regularly get their blood pressure checked whether the symptoms are experienced or not. If your blood pressure is found on the higher side, your doctor may advice you to check it more regularly, and if found consistently high, then medical help may be required to deal with it. Hypertension may be caused due to various different reasons, and so the treatment options also vary, some of them are lifestyle modification, quitting smoking, reducing body weight to optimum body weight according to height and lifestyle, exercise, avoiding alcohol, and also reduction of salt intake. Medication also is advised according to different categories. The main types of anti hypertensive treatments include beta blockers, ACE (Angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors, ARB (Angiotensin II receptor blockers), calcium channel blockers etc. Also if the hypertension is caused due to some long standing illness like a kidney disease, the treatment of the underlying conditions will also help.

The main reason why hypertension is often ignored is because is often does not cause any obvious physical symptoms. However if left untreated, hypertension has very serious complications, like a heart disease: Increased blood pressure would mean an extra effort on the heart which may cause heart failure etc, kidney disease: increased blood pressure causes stress on the kidneys which can damage them and cause failure, Hardening of the arteries: increased pressure causes hardening of the inner lining of the arteries, damage to the eyes, Stroke: this is one of the most serious complications of hypertension caused due to increased pressure causing both hardening as well as dilatation of the blood vessels causing stroke.

There are some simple preventive measures that can be taken to keep your blood pressure under control: quit smoking as soon as possible, limiting intake of caffeine, which you can gradually taper off, reducing salt intake and opt for commercially available salt with low sodium content, limit fatty food consumption, avoiding excessive consumption of alcohol, also in case a high cholesterol level is detected then management of the same is also essential. It has been very commonly seen that once medication is advised for hypertension, people take it regularly until they go for the next check up where if the blood pressure is found to be well within the acceptable range then people assume they are cured and stop taking the medication without consulting the doctor. This is a grave mistake and should never ever be committed. Always seek the advice of your doctor before stopping or changing any medications.

Ebola Racing

By M.C. Linthoingambee In a densely populated country like India where there are massive crowds made up of people teeming together as seen in its markets and public transport like

By M.C. Linthoingambee

In a densely populated country like India where there are massive crowds made up of people teeming together as seen in its markets and public transport like buses and trains, one shudders at the thought of what can unravel if the Ebola virus reaches here.

The outbreak of Ebola in some of the African countries has already triggered off a health crisis in the countries where it has taken lives but has great risks of fast spreading across the globe given the greater movement of people. The primary importance in the life of a human being health, the façade of its presence is being washed away with each growing day whenever there is a looming health crisis. While our leaders while away their time fighting in the political arena, and others elsewhere continue to concentrate on air-strikes, conflicts, territorial dispute, there are many people in need of medicinal aid. Does the solution of being quarantined serve as a sensible cause for the effect brought on by the Ebola virust? While two American aid workers who were infected with Ebola got cured and made headlines all over the world, why have we failed to take notice of those many who have not been able to get treatment? Keeping all that aside, shouldn’t we be focusing more on producing more of those experimenting drugs that was used for them? While China in the past was able to contain its epidemic of the SARC outbreak, many volunteered and the work factor remained cautious and effective. But the African countries who are suffering a huge setback in their economic deficiency will surely find it difficult to recuperate. In the scenario of a cure or treatment procedure yet to be placed in public domain vis a vis the Ebola outbreak, more and more health volunteers continue to disappear either as a result of contracting the virus themselves, fear and several other reasons. Presently, if we look at a bigger picture we can only leave it in God’s grace.

They say ignorance is bliss but sometimes it is not always the most sensible thing. While India has taken effective measures to isolate and quarantine most of its passengers arriving from the heavily infected countries we are at continuous risks of contracting the virus even if a single person happens to be harboring the Ebola virus. Can India deal with such infections? While the Health Ministry continues to stay lax on the matter, we should be raising more and more awareness through any available medium even to the far off villages that lay cornered with no proper communication supply. We can only go to a doctor when we are in need of a serious medical attention but we have limited power and resources but since Public Health is an area of great concern in the general context, we should be looking at a way of tackling the assurance of safety of health though the medium of law and governance. The essential tool for tackling emerging threats on public health needs to be dealt with effective policies and real counter measures of management through the onward source of law.

The legal framework for health in India draws its powers form the likes of Article 47 contained in the Constitution of India as a Directive Principles of State policy where the duty of the state to raise the level of nutrition and the standard of living and to improve public health is recognized among importance safeguards. Public health law focuses on the nexus between law, public health and the legal tools applicable to public health issues. With each growing day, the implementations put forth for ensuring and guaranteeing public health earlier might not work for today since the necessity requires that new medicines be put at place and researchers affirmed in their positions for clinical development of a new vaccine for any new disease that may incur in our country especially to value the goodwill of the people. Though there have been consistent interventions to address public health concerns in the past, there exists a need for a contemporary framework to appropriately use modern legal tools for complex health challenges. But the most critical criterion India continues to tackle today is the reduction of funds allocated to the health sector.

Pharma-corporate giants continues their duty of heavy intervention, the medicines and treatments only become affordable for the rich and while the poor with a low income suffers huge setback. Shouldn’t the job of the governance rely more on equality treatment of patients in spite of their economic backdrop? Can India tackle an effect like the Ebola? Keeping all the complexities aside we can only assume that we wouldn’t know of its effect unless it happens whilst hoping that an emergency to human life does not indeed occur. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as, “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Several agencies like the Doctors without Borders, World Health Organizations and others continue to work under effective governance of various Human Rights Laws. Today, we are just bystanders in history where the daily usage of body bags seems to be increasing in the measure of containing the death. While current economic challenges continue to remain brazen without any outside help, there are many other countries suffering gravely.

Getting to know about Breast Cancer

By Dr Khushboo Shah Sawant Cancer, as we talked about last week is something that brings fear in the minds of people. It is not only a physical ailment but

By Dr Khushboo Shah Sawant

Cancer, as we talked about last week is something that brings fear in the minds of people. It is not only a physical ailment but also affects the person emotionally as well as financially. All in all, it is a condition which affects a person but where everyone surrounding the person affected, also suffer invariably. The last time we discussed the various forms of tumours as well as the details about cancer, its complications and prognosis. This time, we will take one of the most common forms of cancer seen all over the world and discuss some details which all women must be aware of.

So we start with the basics here of what is breast cancer. Breast cancer is a condition which develops because of uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the breast tissue. The growth of these abnormal cells most commonly form a tumour in the breast, which often can be felt like a lump therin. There are various variants of cancer in the breast, however the most common form is the cancer which is formed in the milk secreting ducts is known as ‘ductal carcinoma’

Having said that, we now move on to the next question: what causes breast cancer? The answer to this is still ambiguous, since the exact reason that causes breast cancer in women is still not known. However, it has been seen that the most likely cause may be a combination of a genetic predisposition and age, along with environmental factors. This means that if there is an existence of breast cancer in the family genetic makeup like an immediate blood relative having suffered from it, the chances of the person to get affected increases many fold as well as exposure to cancer causing agents then the chances of suffering from breast cancer has been noted to increase. However, many health experts say that this may not be a confirmed point as there are various incidents noted where women with positive risk factors never suffer from breast cancer while others with no such history may succumb to it.

There have been some risk factors which are seen to be more commonly noted among people suffering from this kind of cancer. The first one being gender as women are known to be more commonly affected by breast cancer, while though rare, it has been seen in men. Next is age, as with increasing age, the chances of breast cancer are seen to increase. After this comes family history, if there have been immediate blood relatives in the family who have suffered from breast cancer the chances of the person increase, for eg. If the mother or sister have suffered from breast cancer, the person stands at a 50% higher chance as compared to any other person who has no such history. Personal history also is important, if a person has already suffered from any other forms of cancer, her chances also increase. Obesity is another risk. Overweight or obese people stand a greater risk as compared to healthier people. Also Alcohol consumption in excess has been noted as another risk factor. Medication : certain medications containing synthetic forms of estrogen are also said to be cancer causing agents when taken without correct medical supervision. Age at menstruation, menopause and childbirth may also play a role in the causing of cancer.

Moving on to our most obvious next question: how can breast cancer be detected? Breast cancer often progresses without any apparent symptom and may show symptoms only after it has progressed to a great extent. However, one of the most common and easy steps in detecting breast cancer is self examination. Some commonly seen symptoms of breast cancer are a lump formation or thickening in the breast tissue, any abnormal discharge from the breast through the nipples, changes in the shape or size of the nipple or inward turning of the nipple, any changes in the shape and size of the breast, scaling of the skin of the breast etc. It is of vital importance to do a self examination on regular basis, to check for any changes in the breast or around the breast. Apart from doing a self examination, there is a procedure called as ‘mammography’ which is the examination of breast that checks for any form of abnormal growth in the breasts.

Today with the advances in science and technology, there are various treatment options available for breast cancer. The key is timely detection of the cancer. Treatment options may be invasive or conservative in nature, like radiation, hormonal therapy, partial or complete breast removal etc. With improved cosmetic surgery, even reconstruction of the removed breast is possible. While often cancer is an inevitable condition we can on our part can do our bit to try and stay healthy. This can be done by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly and staying active, keeping consumption of alcohol to a bare minimum, eating healthy food etc. It is also important to be well aware of one’s family health history as it plays a vital role.

The causing of cancer may not be in our hands but regular checkups and leading a healthy lifestyle is something we can do as our bit, to keep cancer at bay.

Manipur’s Deafness Control Programme under NRHM turns as Flop show

The post Manipur’s Deafness Control Programme under NRHM turns as Flop show appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.By: Rinku Khumukcham   Grant-in-aids under for implementation of National Programme for Prevention and Control of Deafness turns…

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By: Rinku Khumukcham   Grant-in-aids under for implementation of National Programme for Prevention and Control of Deafness turns as flop show in Manipur as State health Mission fails to produce utilization certificate. Around rupees 50 lakhs sanctioned under the National … Continue reading

The post Manipur’s Deafness Control Programme under NRHM turns as Flop show appeared first on  KanglaOnline.com.

Atleast seven hospitalized due to food poisoning in Assam

Jun 16,  5:54 PM| Newsonair.com In Assam, atleast seven persons, including a 13 years old boy were hospitalized due to possible food poisoning at Patgaon bazaar in Kokrajhar district this morning. The… Read more »

Jun 16,  5:54 PM| Newsonair.com In Assam, atleast seven persons, including a 13 years old boy were hospitalized due to possible food poisoning at Patgaon bazaar in Kokrajhar district this morning. The… Read more »

Mysterious disease claims one in Jiribam,Manipur , leaves scores in hospital

IMPHAL, June 7: State Health Minister Phungza-thang Tonsing to day rushed to Jiribam as the outbreak of an undiagnosed disease has left one dead and many at the hospital in… Read more »

IMPHAL, June 7: State Health Minister Phungza-thang Tonsing to day rushed to Jiribam as the outbreak of an undiagnosed disease has left one dead and many at the hospital in… Read more »

Doctor rounds

By Chitra Ahanthem Once upon a time, a trip to a doctor meant a pretty decent time interval where the doctor would take patient history and then follow it up… Read more »

By Chitra Ahanthem
Once upon a time, a trip to a doctor meant a pretty decent time interval where the doctor would take patient history and then follow it up only with required medication instructions. Looking at those times, it is also a matter of great irony that though there were lesser doctors then and few private clinics, there would never be a rush of people waiting for their turns to be medically examined. But they say changes are the only constant of life and the scene has changed and how! For one, the number of doctors and specialized ones has increased and so has the number of private clinics and hospitals and doctors on private service. But along with the number of doctors increasing (and we are talking mainly of urban centers), there is also an ever growing number of people who are becoming inclined towards seeking health services.

There are interesting insights into the phenomenon of seeking health care. There is of course, the fact that people are becoming more aware about the need to be concerned about their health and to take medical opinion. But on the other end of the spectrum is also the fact that urban life styles have added to new medical ailments. Over and above these areas, there is a disquieting tendency for doctors to treat their patients like money spinning enterprises. There is rarely any doctor (doing private practice) in Imphal or for that matter, in the district headquarters who do not charge a set patient consultation fee. Most of these doctors have a family member or a relative manning a sort of ticket table. They allocate serial numbers and take the consultation charge. The going rate at present is Rs. 200 on the first consultation and Rs. 100 for every follow up medical check up. 99.99 per cent of the time, the doctor will give a list of medicines that you have to buy and the ticket attendant will lead you to the in house pharmacy. Chances are also that you will find free doctor samples of medicines being sold.

This piece today is certainly not a chest beating or vitriolic rant against the medical community in Imphal but a mere mirror image of the practices that has become totally normal. It is certainly not a stand-alone practice for the same situation exists in urban areas and cities. But one wishes that there was a standard set of rules or code of conduct and ethics that the medical fraternity here would stick to. Most private clinics that I have seen functioning outside the state have a social responsibility program where they give subsidized health care to senior citizens and people with poor economic backgrounds. I happened to take my son for a surgery for plugging his leaking tear sac at the Nethralaya Eye Institute and was very impressed by the standard of health care and quality that justified with the amount of money they were charging. They had a patient counseling session where they explained the operation and what would follow later on. But what impressed me most was the fact that they had free surgery and medication policy for senior citizens and people from poor backgrounds. For the later, they checked with BPL cards and when I asked what would happen in cases where people do not come with any official documentation specifying that so and so is poor, I was told that the one thumb rule to check such cases was the desperation of people seeking services and the state of their appearance. I was told that it was as simple as that!

Personally, I have nothing against doctors on private practice so long as they are not shirking their Government work timings. It is I as a consumer, and customer and patient party who is aware that I can also seek his service at a subsidized rate at the government hospital where he/she is practicing. And if this “I” feel that waiting at a hospital is not in the order of things, it is only fair that “I” pay for the time that the doctor has devoted to me. But having said that, there are many areas that need to be considered from the doctor’s viewpoint that justifies the money that is being charged for his consultation. For one, it would do well to have a strict order of who gets in first. Very often, doctors have a set consultation time, which is known or announced. Patients troop in and an attendant, who allocates a serial number, takes down their names. But mostly, the serial numbers do not matter because someone they know or some one in their social circle drops in unannounced for a check up. Also, there are certain doctors who will give first priority towards the patients they have been administering at his/her government hospital set up but who follow up with him later on a private consultation basis. This would mean that they would jump the waiting list and ruffle up a few feathers.

End-point:
They say that an apple a day keeps the doctor away but either, something is wrong with the apples or the doctors have become indispensible for on an average basis, about 4 people out of 10 would most definitely be seeking medical attention or consultation at any given time: if not for his own self, for a family member, for a child etc.

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Let it be

var addthis_product=’wpp-252′;var addthis_options=”Google+1″muses of a lovelorn soul insights of an engaging mind a figment of imagination of a restless life… voice that comes like a gentle breeze…

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var addthis_product=’wpp-252′;var addthis_options=”Google+1″muses of a lovelorn soul insights of an engaging mind a figment of imagination of a restless life… voice that comes like a gentle breeze…

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Editorial – Slow Poison

Leader Writer: Paojel Chaoba Though the state is presently vexed with many pressing issues which need immediate reddressal. The most important issue seems to be the one in which one… Read more »

Leader Writer: Paojel Chaoba
Though the state is presently vexed with many pressing issues which need immediate reddressal. The most important issue seems to be the one in which one is directly or indirectly involved.

The state has seen decades of armed conflict, atrocities, underdevelopment, corruption, AIDS and the menace of drug addiction, which concern all. But, one feels that one of the most important threats which need to be dealt with is the disease of alcoholism which has occupied a pandemic situation in Manipur.

Manipur, a virtually ‘dry state’ according to the state government can be termed as a farce. The pipeline of alcohol has been laid from outside the state and presently, everyone is enjoying the delightful ‘flood’ which pours out from the said pipes. The state itself has a colorful cultural background of brewing liquor . Andro, Sekmai and Phayeng areas are synonymous with quality local made brew.  The dry state status can be compared to a pact made between a joker and a thief, none is credible.

Many a lives, precious ones also have lost due the conflict situation, intravenous use of drugs and spread of HIV virus. But as of late, it may be safe to say that through widespread awareness programs , the AIDS/HIV pandemic has been brought to a controlled stage now. But, like the proverbial snake in the grass, it can be said that more people have died of alcohol abuse and the effects of alcohol have caused a domino effect to the families of the alcoholic’s and further to the society, which is more cause for concern.

Addressing the seriousness of the abuse and its effects on society, certain civil organizations namely All Manipur Anti Drugs Association (AMADA) and Coalition Against Drugs and Alcohol (CADA) have carried out drives to stop liquor vending and brewing.

The drives were met with mixed responses from the public, but the bottom line is though the all out effort which was time consuming, financially and physically taxing to the anti drug volunteers, the problem refuses to go.

Prior to the drives, certain insurgent groups had issued dictates’ that drug pushers will be given capital punishment and users even severely reprimanded on numerous occasions, had also failed to bear fruit.

Alcohol  is viewed as a ‘social’ drug. No one gives much ado if one returns home with a whiff of liquor. Celebrations invoke openings of branded bottles and posing for a photograph in one best suit with a glass of the bubbly is considered a ‘Kodak’ moment. Having a collection of rare vintages is considered a status symbol.

The Manipuri society being an amalgamation of diverse cultures gives equal opportunity to the sections to indulge themselves in the festivities. From the beginning of the calendar till the end, Manipur despite its problems observes a yearlong party. The dipsomaniac at these occasions has a perfectly good excuse for not able to reach home.

‘Controlled drinking’ is a term often used by teetotalers and those who dislike drinking and the angry wife. As two individual cannot have similar fingerprints, the genetic defects and the tendency to be addicted differs from individual to individual.

After some time the tolerance of a person to alcohol develops and thus addiction starts. One may put an alcoholic family member for treatment at a rehabilitation centre. The person may undergo the program, but after getting out from the centre, relapses again.

The causes for relapse are varied, but the most common is the desire to drink and to be in the company of ‘old friends’. The person tends to go back to the old habits.

To give aid to those who wish to stay sober and overcome their addiction ,Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)  ,an international mutual aid movement declaring its “primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety”  must be initiated in the state for the alcoholics seeking recovery.

AA, started in 1935  and is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to ‘stop drinking’. There are no dues or fees for membership and is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. So, the need of the hour is to propagate AA in the state, so that it may spread to each nook and cranny and help those persons who want to be rid of alcohol. It will not be an exaggeration to say that alcohol is a slow poison. An alcoholic dies silently, unnoticed and contemptuously. Its up to you –die a heroic death or have a miserable end. And the society’s responsibility is to ensure that everyone dies honorably. For this, help the helpless. Lets join hands to help the helpless.

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The Next Generation

By Awmtea Sailo Have you ever been in a Catch 22 situation? This is a place where no matter what you do, the outcome is going to be deadly! A… Read more »

By Awmtea Sailo
Have you ever been in a Catch 22 situation? This is a place where no matter what you do, the outcome is going to be deadly!

A man caught between a steep cliff behind him and a gang of murderers with guns in front is in that situation. There is no going forward – he will be shot. If he steps back he will fall to his death.

Catch 22 – what should he do?!!

That’s the place, generation after generation of youngsters in Manipur, and from other places in the North East, find themselves in. They can’t stay in Manipur – there is not much to look forward to. No universities for higher learning. No professional courses and very few jobs available.

In short no future. They have to leave.

But when they leave they go to cities like Delhi. Where they are uprooted from family, on their own, making their own decisions, their own relationships, to follow their own value systems. More often than not the outcome is terrible.

So many, are trapped into drugs, mafias, money laundering, prostitution. So many, die of overdose, of AIDS. Suffering the pain of loneliness and broken relationships, some become suicidal.

Catch 22 – what should they do?

My name is Awmtea, from Churachandpur, Manipur, living in Munirka, New Delhi. A crowded, bustling corner of Delhi, full of young people from the North East New Delhi. Without family, in a hostile city, they end up as easy prey for anyone who cares to exploit fellow humans for their own gain. Many are jobless, addicted to hard-core drugs, and hopeless. They end up in the clutches of money laundering mafias, and prostitute rings. Along with a committed team, we have been working with these young people for the past two years.

There is one way out of a Catch 22 situation. When concerned people get involved to help out what seems to be an impossible situation. The man on the cliff needs a net to break his fall, he needs friends who will stand with him against those who would destroy him.

We look to come together and stand against these terrible consequences of alienation. We need to help make the difference so that future generations are not lost. To stand against the destructive forces of drugs, addictions, easy money etc so that we build healthy generations for the future.

We also plan a ‘net’ to help those in emergency situations. We will shortly be opening the Jesiah Community Centre. Here we will offer free consultation and hospital care for anyone from the North East especially, suffering from drug related diseases, such as TB, HIV/Aids. Through the week, people will be available to treat the sick, help those ready to detox, look for jobs, teach English or just cook and hang out together. Along with this there will be more than one open home for these young men and women.

Is your child coming to Delhi and needs help? Is someone here already and you are worried about them? Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us. We will be happy to connect with you and work together for the good of our young.

They deserve it.

(Please get in touch with us at jesiahcentre@gmail.com or phone 9818041859 or 9868911541)

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Smoking side effects and why you need to quit before it’s too late – Mocha Athokpam

An awareness video compilation by Mocha to show the side effects of smoking and why it’s best to quit smoking before it’s too. Mocha also says “His intention is not… Read more »

An awareness video compilation by Mocha to show the side effects of smoking and why it’s best to quit smoking before it’s too. Mocha also says “His intention is not… Read more »

Braille Printing Machine at Manipur

Inauguration function of Braille Printing Machine at the Ideal Blind School, Takyel, Manipur.  Manipur is the first among the North-East India to possess the said Machine. Altogether there are 9-12 such machine… Read more »

Inauguration function of Braille Printing Machine at Manipur

Inauguration function of Braille Printing Machine at Manipur

Inauguration function of Braille Printing Machine at the Ideal Blind School, Takyel, Manipur.  Manipur is the first among the North-East India to possess the said Machine. Altogether there are 9-12 such machine of similar type is available in India.

web definition on Braille:
A system of writing invented by Louis Braille, in which letters and some combinations of letters are represented by raised dots arranged in three rows of two dots each and are read by the blind and partially sighted using the fingertips.

Photographs Courtesy and Copyright:   Mr. Amarendra Laimayum

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